Tuesday, September 20, 2011

The Five Parts Of The Soul

Goddess nut



The Five Parts of the Soul


Ib
In the salty womb, from one drop
of mother’s blood, comes the heart
whole, master and servant
will and conception,
thought’s matrix.

Sheut
From the feet falls the shadow
from which we never part
dark essence of our selves light
dances with always
across the skin of the world.


Ren
We are given a name
and in taking it start,
by naming reveal and conceal
destroy, endure,
possess and make.


Ba
Within, the bird of the soul
makes herself with art
ever singing, ever flying;
song and destination
all we are


Ka
From the potter’s wheel
our shell is spun, molded, mark
given form, then spark,
spirit’s voice for the quickening
within

Goddess Nut 2

So living true we amalgamate and form
these parts a whole, building from the heart,
knowing the shadow, named and naming,
flying  with soul and flame of life
to walk with the Sun under Sky
fight through black and
lightless Underworld
and out, remade, a million
times a million journeys, ever new.


September 2011









Once again I do a magpie raid on mythology, this time picking up some of the shiny concepts of the soul and the afterlife as conceived by the ancient Egyptians. They are loosely and imaginatively rendered here, not literally.



Images of Nut, the Eqyptian Sky Goddess, protecting Ra, the Sun disk, and dividing order from chaos

17 comments:

  1. smiles. it is when we get themout of balancethat we are in trouble...each a beautiful thing, yet each can be spun into something much darker...but we are remade often...like the point you end on...

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  2. Passion, darkness, power, art, and spark all molded into a gorgeous poem. The last stanza encircles and incants, singing into being. I love that the Ancient Egyptians had no use for the brain (wasn't preserved in canopic jars) and the test for entering the next life was that your heart must weigh less than a feather.

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  3. This is beautiful, Hedge. You keep amazing me.

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  4. I always say, the further you go back, the better you see the future. I take a lot of hope for our lot from this phoenix leaf torn from the Book of the Dead, for if we can be so well named (even -- or especially -- imaginally), then we have that far to go. Tell your Moonwitch to tune in here, the 5-part harmony is gawgeous. - Brendan

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  5. Intriguing, informative, entertaining. =)

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  6. Love Egyptian Myth, and really love this piece. You raided well indeed today. Lots of truths in here, very resonant today as they were any time before Ib and Ka are easily my favorite ones here. Great write.

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  7. So beautiful. "flying with soul and flame of life to walk with the Sun under Sky". Perfection.

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  8. I like the examining the various dimensions that make a soul. Meditative and thoughtful. Acceptance of shadow as part of whole, contrast with 'light dance' is interesting, and something i would be pondering about. Thanks for the poem.

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  9. quite imaginatively and uniquely and brilliantly rendered, Joy! with a ray of hope to hold onto that if we don't get it right this time around, there will be another chance. {smile} ♥

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  10. Thanks all. Appreciate you reading my positive moment of the month. ;-)

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  11. I've learned a lot about Egyptian mythology this week from you and Velvetinapurrs. Interesting that the shadow comes before the form....

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  12. Thanks for reading Mark--I'm not sure if I followed cannon on the order, but the shadow was pretty critical--they believed you couldn't exist without it; all of the things listed had to be there before you had form, except the name, which came after birth, and was also a living part of you that eradicated could destroy you, or in written/spoken form could preserve your identity after physical death.

    The interesting part to me is how well their belief system worked out for them, in a purely literal sense of persisting after death--what other culture still has the names of their 3,000 years dead kings on living lips, their actual physical bodies in museums, looked at every day by thousands of people? It may not be what they had in mind, but it certainly is a perpetuation past cultural death.

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  13. Ancient Mythology, Gods, I cannot help but love in poetry. Your exploration of the Ancient Egyptian is wonderful here.

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  14. Thanks Luke. Always good to have you drop by.

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  15. Heart, shadow, name, flame...a million journeys. I really do wonder about reincarnation. Beautiful poem, Joy.

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  16. This is amazing, Joy. I've not come across this terminology since college and you have me lamenting that I rid of a book to consult. Seriously, this write is something that should be fashioned on an old scroll and hung as an offering to remember the blood of life IS the journey. Beautiful ~

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'Poetry is an echo asking a shadow to dance' ~Carl Sandburg