Thursday, February 7, 2013

Pretext



passionflower

Pretext




Liriope played a wind-doll's calliope
under a blackbrowed sky.
A vinca minor chased Ursa Major
where the melting butters fly.
Passiflora stigmata tapped out her sonata
on clouds dusted with ebony flies.
Red amaranthus and blue agapanthus
ate old Agamemnon's dark eyes.


Agapanthus inapertus is of the deepest blue of all agapanthus




And all of this is truer, love, than
the lie you made goodbye.

~February 2013



Red Amaranthus? Creepymus morelike


55 mixed metaphors for   the g-man


If you'd like to hear the poem read to get the names straight, please click below:


Pretext by Hedgewitch O'theWilds

Process notes: For those who care about minutia, liriope is a common grassy groundcover in the southern US, also called lilyturf or monkey grass. Vinca minor (or periwinkle) is a vining ground cover with small leaves and blue flowers. Ursa Major, or the Great Bear, is a constellation.  The genus Passiflora, though it includes over 500 species, does not actually have one called stigmata. That was just me making things up. Its common name is however Passionflower, because it's many unusual flowering parts are said to tell the story of the passion of Christ, including its 3 prominent stigmas representing the three nails used in the crucifixion.  
Amaranthus is a large old-fashioned annual with pendulous reddish-purple flower bracts, known also as Love Lies Bleeding, and agapanthus is a mostly tropical bulb with blue globe-shaped blooms on long stalks, also called Lily of the Nile. In Greek myth, Agamemnon was a Mycenaean king who, among other things, commanded the Greeks in the Trojan War.

All images from flick'r and shared under a Creative Commons License
~mouse-over for attribution.

33 comments:

  1. Your mixed metaphors and fauna
    boggle the senses
    Forget about the periwinkle
    Give me Psilocyben Cubenses..
    Loved your Floral 55 Moonbat
    Thanks so much for this beautifully mysterious contribution, thanks for playing, and have a Kick Ass Week-End

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  2. And....I Just Sank Your Battleship!!!

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    1. Wouldn't be the first time I've been blown out of the water. Have a kick-ass weekend your own self.

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  3. the lie you just made goodbye...what a stirring last line...wow, i think those are all flower names, maybe? smiles...what an amazing flower that first picture is...wow

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  4. No one mixes a metaphor finer, hedgewitch :)

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  5. Oh, lots of dreaming of Springtime for 55's! I have a black thumb. I am currently nursing a dead cactus back from Hades. I don't think the underworld will let him go...
    My greatest wish is to have that magical green thumb some folks have. They walk by growing things, and those things grow more happy.
    I also just finished reading The Secret Garden, and it makes me long for green things!

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    1. Laughing at the hellspawn cactus. They say it's a sign you're finally an adult when your houseplants live. ;_) Really, growing things is pretty simple--plants are just animals without feet, after all, and have really basic needs; like animals need food, shelter and water, plants need light, the right growing medium and water. But they also need one more thing, beneficent neglect, cuz, no feet--they can't run away from you. :P

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    2. Not convinced! I truly it takes a magic I do not possess. Living things see me coming and commit suicide. If I fell in love with a clump of crabgrass, it would die shortly my declaration of love.

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  6. ...blackbrowed sky! I adore that. As for all the tongue twisting flower names.... I did my best with them. Read Brandi's comment... My son was the son in the musical "Secret Garden" years ago. Sigh...

    I plan on attempting a bit of floral planting this spring. It can be tricky here in the south. It does seem like many go with flowering bushes.

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    Replies
    1. Yes, the summers we've been having, hot and dry, are tedious for growing things. Mulch helps. I love the references to the Secret Garden--that was one of my favorite books as a child.

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    2. I grew up tending my parents garden which was about two acres (not kidding) We had tons of corn and pumpkins which take up a lot of space, even so, I hated weeding. I really didn't take to gardening and did a TON of complaining. I SO remember the year my mom learned about mulching - every year after that I NEVER complained when it was time to mulch.

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    3. My husband has a similar story about weeding his dad's humormous truck garden--I guess that chore always fell to the kids, and he was an only child. (!) He is a pretty rabid vegetable gardener himself, but does everything in raised beds and containers, so weeding is pretty non-existent. I'm the one out there fighting the eternal crabgrass, but yes, mulch really really helps.

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  7. Ah, you have soundly outdone me. My 55 is as a wall-eyed, three-legged milk cow when compared with your garlanded racehorse of a poem. I do love it when you incorporate garden flowers into your work, Joy.

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    1. Thank you Shay--but I greatly enjoyed your three legged cow.

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  8. "'I'll love you, dear, I'll love you
    Till China and Africa meet,
    And the river jumps over the mountain
    And the salmon sing in the street,"


    Ha.

    But I think you've considerably upped the ante. (Now I'm thinking of Auntie Mamenon.) I agree with Shay - only in my case I'd only been thinking of a 55. Pre-emptively struck! (This is terrific and great reading too.)

    k.

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    1. One of my fave Auden quotes(and poems). And oh, so appropriate here. Thanks, k. I'm just amazed you can carry all this poetry in your head--every year mine is more like a sieve, and only the really big shiny poem parts remain any more.

      Auntie Mamenon! You slay me.

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    2. I don't carry many around in my head at all, but every once in a while, I'll get in a swivet about memorizing poems. A couple of years ago especially I read a great book about memory and memory palaces (Moonwalking with Einstein - Joshua Foer) which gives all these memory championship techniques. They are very effective but actually quite hard and I went through a brief period when, under the spell of the book, I was memorizing a poem or so a day. Needless to say it was a super brief period! (LIke a week, and then all the resolutions to do it forever gave out.) The techniques work but take a lot of concentration-- I have kind of let all that stuff go slack of late. k.

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    3. I used to be able to memorize poems automatically(and phone numbers, too!) I still know most of The Highwayman, which I read at 8, and Ulalume. Those memory exercises are probably a good thing, but like you, I am thinking they'd get tiresome pretty fast, even with very good poems. Have a safe trip and a good weekend, k.

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  9. this is bright and brilliant all around.

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  10. I love the fun of the sounds in this song-- and remained unsure about truth until your narrator made her point. Such fun in mockery.

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  11. A great mix of words and it read so well. Excellent.

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  12. I love mixed metaphors. Love lines 3,4, and 5, music worthy of the blooms and the reason they say poetry must be read aloud. Love the flowers!

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  13. You wouldn't be anxious for spring, would you? I never met-a-phor I didn't like, but I especially enjoy the way you've mixed yours!
    Cheers Joy!

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  14. I loved the last line...great.
    Great pics ;)

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  15. The gorgeous naming of the flowers in juxtaposition to the lying that ended love is powerful. But, oh, the sound of those flowers.

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  16. This is so beautiful. I loved listening and reading. The pictures..., spectacular.

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  17. I love mixed metaphors. They're so much fun. My favorite is the "blackbrowed sky."

    Flash 55 - Dreams

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  18. What is the font you use on your pages?

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'Poetry is an echo asking a shadow to dance' ~Carl Sandburg