Saturday, March 23, 2013

Some Day Soon



Some Day Soon




Someday soon I'll take off
this blue Hag's face.
I'll wear tassels and bells, not goatskin
mismatched shoes one joy one sorrow,
stained gypsy skirt belled like brass shot
and ambered with old blood and tears,
a blouse of white love 
too lacy too tight
around the heart.

Someday soon
perhaps I'll get puffed
out-blown, naked self all milkweed
on the wind, sketching strong simple
lines of charcoal breeze
after a life of endless baroque
bodice-bound artifice,
where each day's
a button coming loose, 

a dangle on a frayed thread
teasing to be snapped
and each hour of the night's
wrapped in a rotting winding sheet,
strip by strip unwound
by tarnished imps
of that procrastinating dawn
when at last
light of my heart

I'll see your 
river smoothed face again,
as finger by finger
you pry time open,
the stony fist
surprised
into letting me go.



~March 2013


© Ella, of Ella's Edge








 posted for   real toads
Challenge:Releasing the Inner Wild
from the very Wild Sherry Blue Sky, who asks us to write of our inner wildness, or even the Crone, as I have done here.




Optional Musical Accompaniment






Top image: Artist unknown, via She Who Is, on facebook
Bottom image: Inspire Angella, © Ella, of Ella's Edge



36 comments:

  1. Ha! Immediately upon seeing the title, I thought of one of my favorite songs, and then there it is, at the end of the post. How cool is that?

    I love the mismatched shoes, one joy and one sorrow, and the naked self all milkweed on the wind. These are the kinds of wordings that make poetry so rich and different from any other kind of writing. And, too, they are lighter, breezier, than is your wont, and I like them for that. It is the stubborn flower whose bloom is most treasured.

    The ending is just superb. Goodness, Joy. You've really found your groove lately with your last three poems.

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    1. Thanks, Shay. Yes, the music wanted to go with the poem--I know it's been re-recorded many times since 1972, but this is my favorite version.

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  2. dang. very nice hedge...i really like...
    i like the transformation at the beginning, the taking off and putting on...or maybe just revealing what is there underneath...i like the shoes too...ha...and milkweed white...sketching the charcoal breeze...very visual but suggestive too of art...river smooth face is cool as well there in the end...well played...

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  3. A new favorite - maybe I've got a lot of crone (though I'd rather think of it as croon) I especially like the part of each day being a button dangling and how it moves into the frayed thread teasing to be snapped. First, I like the kind of little joke on button and snap and then I think of those three fates - is that what they are - cutting the threads on life--and the end with the time pried and stony fist is just great but actually the whole poem is just lovely. My punctuation point which you are free to take or leave (as always) is that I'd consider hyphen between river and smoothed. I have some doubts on this point - I like the break also - I'll see your river and smoothed face as a variation on river, and that ambiguity is okay - but somehow I like the idea of river-smoothed better because of all the rocks --and yet, I know many people who do not care about punctuation will just read it that way without the hyphen, and find it perfectly clear, but I guess I am enough of a crone to like to bossily direct things with punctuation, it is only a thought. Great work. k.

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    1. Thanks, Karin. I actually have already agonized over that break--to hyphen, or move smoothed up next to river, or just leave--finally I got burned out on it and just stopped rewriting. I will look again tomorrow.
      Smiling at Croon. ;_) When I was a child in Chicago, I lived with my Svenska grandparents in a two-flat, and upstairs were two Swedish spinster sisters, Tilly and Ida Kroon--they were Kroons *and* crones, and made the very best Swedish coffeecake I've ever had.

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    2. I think there are benefits to leaving - hard to say - hyphen-over line can be a bit cutesy which wouldn't go with this poem and there are various meanings. I tend to over-punctuate, and over-compensate.

      Funny about the Kroons - wondering now if it means something in Swedish, which unfortunately I do not know! (I feel I should.) k.

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    3. I think it might mean something to do with crown, but though I could understand Swedish when I was little because my grandparents constantly spoke it (especially for things they didn't want to say in front me--to which I paid special attention) I have forgotten most of what I knew. Sadly, often the same with English. ;_)

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  4. In this poem, again, you give us such exquisitely beautiful images. I love the milkweed!

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  5. Hedgewitch, your poems are always the very finest - this one elevates one far beyond the theme, and leaves me in awe at your command of language AND how you bend each poem to your will. Sigh. Especially admirable: the blouse of white love too lacy, too tight around the heart......where each day's a button coming loose......(in my case, more than buttons coming loose, hee hee)......the winding sheet.......and then you deliver the coup de grace : the entire concluding stanza. Fantastic writing and thanks for writing to my prompt, kiddo.

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    1. My pleasure Sherry--I'm so glad you liked it.Thanks for being such a supportive reader and all around good person.

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  6. I could feel myself in the words "where each day's a button coming loose" ...I've reached that age where it's either me falling apart or my clothes.
    Loved your poem, Hedge. I thought about getting into the hyphenation question and decided to defer to your own best judgment, as it is your own poem.
    Keep up the wonderful work. You are a grand poet, and I chose the word deliberately.
    K

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  7. Between the first and the last stanza, I held my breath.. what an invocation to the eternal feminine, regardless of time, age, wear and tear of life. I love this so much.

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  8. I think of some classical Greek play, captured on film and played in slow, delicious motion! There is a drama here that is not all about words, but about appearances, weathered and a fist - like a metaphor of stony Medusa! Adored this!

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  9. One of these days, to break loose and truly be. The older I get, the closer I come to actually doing so.

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  10. Impressive work Hedge ~ Love the blouse of white love, the button coming loose each day, and finally the last verse, the river, smoothed face again ~

    Happy Sunday ~

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  11. I love your poem, the dance of before and the transition of what is to come! I too loved how you described the blouse-you created a mood of wonder..I am going to read it again...it was like a sensual journey of a spirit transformed-I love Judy Collins :D

    This poem reads like a treasure map! <3 it
    When is your book coming out?!
    ;D

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    1. Thanks, Ella. What a lovely comment. I really appreciate how you saw beneath things. The book is out--if you click the link it will take you to Amazon--Kindle edition is only five dollars, and you get Shay and MZ, too, which insures you will never be bored reading it! ;_)

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    2. Happy Days ... your book is on my Kindle!!!

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    3. Thank you Helen! I hope you enjoy it.

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  12. I have no words worthy to post, amazing

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  13. This is like prayer. Incredibly beautiful, Hedge.

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  14. Someday soon. "Milkweed on the wind," indeed! A powerful statement of the power, the wisdom, and the what-the-hell of crones everywhere! I am an avid Susun Weed fan and this fits so well with the philosophy shared by so many of us, but missed by the young: Just because there's snow on the roof doesn't mean the stove ain't cookin'!

    Thanks so much! Another proud crone, Amy

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  15. Another crone weighing in. And we do wear both shoes of joy and sorrow, don't we? The last stanza is gorgeous .

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  16. Brilliant lines here, Hedge:

    finger by finger
    you pry time open,
    the stony fist
    surprised
    into letting me go

    Could either be a good plastic surgeon, expensive serums or the one who knows and loves you best. I vote for the latter.

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  17. Your poem took me back to 1972 ... thirty-one year old mom with four children under the age of twelve. 'Someday Soon' my mantra. Honored to wear the tassels and bells, blouse with loosened buttons today.

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  18. whew, fantastic... new favorite. on the wind.

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  19. Your poem is wonderful! loved So many wonderful lines - from the mismatched shoes, blouse too tight around the heart, pry time open!

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  20. Hello, Hedge!! Excellent to read you...I just love that the goatskin shoes are named and so appropriate for it to be the feet encumbered by sorrow or made light by joy...I feel that into existence for sure.

    I love your descriptions throughout the first stanza is very tactile with your descriptions of material...the bells,love that coppery glow behind my mind's eye.

    You drew me right in as did the beginning of your second portion...I agree with Shay about the airiness of this and I love the symbolism and how it translates metaphorically with the cycles of life for us as humans.

    Beautiful writing indeed. Thank you!

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  22. Simply beautiful... your words "where each day's a button coming loose" to "the stony fist surprised into letting me go" hurled me into a moving fantasy... loved it Joy!
    Cheers :)

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  23. You lull me with your poetry, hedgewitch, into a sense of peace and a place of magic.

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  24. So many good things here. Notably:-

    sketching strong simple
    lines of charcoal breeze

    until the last stanza trumped them all. Delightful write.

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  25. Replies
    1. O yeah, baby. I burned the bra years ago though.

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  26. This is brilliant. I echo Sherry's sentiments. Your writing is top notch.

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  27. Wow, this is amazing. The talk of clothing, vivid, too constricting, and then the, " out-blown, naked self all milkweed/ on the wind" is so good it stings. And of course I love the final stanza with all its timey-wimey stuff. Really a powerful write Joy.

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'Poetry is an echo asking a shadow to dance' ~Carl Sandburg