Tuesday, April 16, 2013

The Ignorant Seed




The Ignorant Seed
A Roundel




The seed's not born knowing more than to fly
where it's up-thrown, blue-skied like the linnet.
Where it falls unfeathered and bound to lie    
the seed's not born knowing.

Ignorance, rain and the earth begin it,
the labor to live without knowing why,
to crack and splash out the thing within it

to be the bait for the hummingbird's eye
nectar, fragrance, a color infinite,
then die where it stands without a goodbye;
the seed's not born knowing.


~April 2013




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Challenge:I Say Roundel, You Say Rondolet
The well-in*formed* Marian Kent challenges us to attack either the roundel or rondolet form to get our April benumbed poetic juices flowing. I did the Roundel, simply because I'm a Swinburne fan and he invented it. I played a bit loose with the meter and stresses here and there, but hey, it's 4:30 in the morning. I blame Algernon.



Here is the free verse fragment I pulled this from, just for fun. I really like the roundel better, I think.



Seed


The seed knows
very little; only to fly with the wind
to land where it's thrown
to push out what's in it,
be if it can
a tall  womb for bees
then die where it stands.


~April 2013






25 comments:

  1. They are both lovely poems and really quite different for all of the unknowing seed. I like the rounded because of the linnet and kind of a quiet homage to Yeats to me and I love the blue- skied.

    The bee'a womb is lovely too and a great simplicity in that one. K.

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    1. Thanks, k. Yeats is always echoing in the rhymed ones, isn't he? Especially if they're about nature.

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  2. The central stanza of your Roundel is a real treat...like the filling in a sandwich. LOL

    Ignorance, rain and the earth begin it,
    the labor to live without knowing why,
    to crack and splash out the thing within it.

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  3. Joy Ann, I love the Roundel. Beautiful, lilting lines. I am always appreciative of well written form poetry. I didn't realize you were doing napo. See how out of touch I am. I hope all is well with you.

    Pamela

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    1. Thanks, pamels. Yes I do this torture every year--I find it to be a good exercise in ingenuity, if nothing else. ;_) Thanks for reading, and all is well here, if a bit disrupted by national events atm.

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  4. Yes, the first is beautiful - a bit prayer like.

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  5. Oh my I love both poems, but the first is stunning. The middle stanza of the roundel is amazing...I am always blessed when I read your work!

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  6. love it, right on! especially "bait for the hummingbird's eye."
    they could arrive here anytime, i should put out my feeders/bait.
    the seeds do what they do, and we are graced by their efforts.

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    1. We saw our first yesterday and put the feeder out--poor little guy, it's still really too cold for them but hopefully this is the last cold snap--thanks for a great, and very helpful prompt, Marian. Yeesh this is a long month!

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  7. I was just thinking, I think too much. I need to be like the seed :) Thanks for the parable.

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  8. Enjoying this pairing of your free verse with the formed Roundel. You've brought exquisite imagery, I esp. like falls unfeathered, to ignorance. Not so surprising, though, is the way your free verse version shows the seed's truth more blatantly. A really great pairing.

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    1. Thanks, Jane--and thanks for reading and commenting on all those poems yesterday--I appreciate your thoughts and reactions very much.

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  9. The roundel gave your original idea firm muscle and structure. So much I love in your lines: the words to rhyme with linnet, the fragment that becomes the refrain and this crucial line: the labor to live without knowing why...

    Superb!

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    1. Yes, it's a lot of work to ask of us, even for a seed. Thanks, Kerry.

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  10. This is beautifully philosophical. You did a terrific job with a difficult form!

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  11. The roundel form is new for me as was a linnet. You showed me much to admire. I love to be bait for the hummingbird's eye. What a great image.

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  12. Oh my!! Hedge!! This sings to my heart...there's so much wisdom in the seed and the not knowing...both forms are exquisite!!

    Love the rhymes you used and this:" it's up-thrown, blue-skied" I love that...wording that one doesn't expect!

    The bee's womb in your freeverse! Love that.

    I enjoyed the art you chose for your ekphrastik challenge...I'm sorry I didn't get to join you guys though...busy weekend. :)'s

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  13. I think the roundel is much richer. I like this tremendously, Hedge.

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  14. I seem to be in good company this evening ... the roundel is my favorite too. So many wonderful lines ..

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  15. I like the roundel better. This shouldn't be butchered down to minimalistic free-form at all imho. :) A lot of hope felt after reading this one.

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  16. oh! you said it so well....the seed does not know ... and neither do we....:)

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  17. You rocked this one! And the picture - I just love it.

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  18. I always feel sorry for little seedlings springing up amidst brick and mortar, concrete and construction. It does not know it won't become a tree. In this case, I would say ignorance is bliss, not knowing or caring what its fate is, just growing because it's in its DNA.
    A fine write once again, Joy. You see so much.
    K

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  19. I enjoyed both poems the first had more texture which I truly enjoyed but, the second one had a nice easy flow just like a seed.

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'Poetry is an echo asking a shadow to dance' ~Carl Sandburg