Thursday, May 30, 2013

Prometheus





Prometheus


Wiregrass and sassafras
strangle in the dust
of the dreadful dream.

Starwine and alkaline
bottled in the past,
the cellared scream

of something trapped
something up-lapping
dry stream.

Hyacinth vine and columbine
trail over the
jagged hole

in vulture sky, alibi
 rejected
for the heat he stole

when 
so long ago
 he saw her soul.



~May 2013








55 nibbles at the liver for    the g-man








Image: Prometheus, by Arnold Böcklin, 1883
Public domain, via wikipaintings.org

22 comments:

  1. Yikes - great rhyme and rhythm here - very Victorian - I cant think of whom I am thinking of - I want to say Browning - but maybe there's a bit more Hardy here - those wonderful short-changed lines that are so effective with their rhymes. Your mix of images is so great here - big jump from Hyacinth vine to alibi somehow. Very cool. k.

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    1. After I wrote it, it reminded me of Stephen Crane, who was himself a bit of a deconstructionist amongst the Victorians. I truly do love Hardy, as well, and have read a lot of his poetry. Thanks, k.

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    2. I have been looking and looking (online) for the poem that came to mind. Yours is your own, of course, and much more mysterious and jammed with cool imagery that I think Victorians might forego -- but I think you'd like the one that I'm trying to get because it has, like yours, a beautiful rhyme scheme that seems to have a foreshortened line. I can picture it in a book I had that I liked a lot - where it fell in the book - but every time I look some phrase that seems familiar I get Frost Stopping by the Woods on a Snowy Evening! Crazy! Ha. k.

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    3. Ha! The ghost of Frost and his forking path--it's everywhere! Yes, most of the Victorian poets were very long on narrative and form, and very sparing with imagery. But I do think they had a grasp of the heart of things that we sometimes lose. Good luck on your hunt, k--didn't mean to drive you crazy. ;_)

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  2. Joy Ann, I like the descent this takes to the ultimate end, her soul being seen by the wrong one.
    Nice use of rhyme.

    Pamela

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    1. Well, it was mostly bad bongos for him, in this case. Thanks, pamela. I will be out and about visiting tomorrow--will be stopping by to see what you've been up to.

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  3. The light in this painting almost fooled me into anticipating a different mood. Started reading poem and took a second look at the image and noticed the dark brooding clouds ... and then the figure! I looked this story up and felt sorry for this God. Zeus was quite the stinker! So glad Herakles (Hercules?) released him from bondage. Greek Mythology is more complicated than modern day soap operas!

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    1. Yes, the light is striking and the figure is very shadowy--and the myth is a classic example of injustice and sacrifice. The Greek Gods do bring soap operas to mind, Margaret, especially their love lives. ;_)

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  4. I love what was inspired, hedgewitch, by this painting. It seemed one thing, but you took it to a whole other level and I loved taking the journey.

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  5. wow. the first two stanza are nicely mirrored...and get us started on a great scheme...love the end though...what he stole when he saw her soul..beautiful piece hedge...

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  6. Great take on the Prometheus myth. Enjoyed it.

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  7. Here is an odd thing: normally, I have to read your work slowly, and that is how I think good poetry should be read; but with this one, after a slow reading the first time, i read it quickly the second time and it worked that way, for me. Like a quick chant.

    The title is ideal.

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  8. I love you tight rhyme, every time your writing gets me, let's me ascend.

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  9. Nobody likes a thieving bastard do they?
    He got what he deserved!
    I always tingle at your Mythological forays.
    I think in another life YOU were The Oracle
    Loved your Unbound 55
    Thanks for your Friday Genius...You Rock!
    Have a Kick Ass Week-End

    (Whenever I hear people speak of Hardy, this is what I think of...Pessimistic Fatalism. You aren't quite THAT depressing)

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  10. Every word I can think of to compliment you becomes trite in comparison to this post. Wow.

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  11. The Böcklin painting totally blew me away, could not avert my eyes ~~ that is, until I read the poem.

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  12. I love the internal rhyme, but also the words that form them - the wines and vines, wire grass and sassafras..It sounds beautiful on the ear and opens the imagination to incredible scenes too.

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  13. Love the rhyme and structure. I always enjoy your mythological references.

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  14. The poem certainly adds to the sombre picture.

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  15. I like the way this is put together, the rhythm. And Prometheus is a favorite of mine.

    Flash 55 - prick lee

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'Poetry is an echo asking a shadow to dance' ~Carl Sandburg