Monday, May 27, 2013

Spring Song



Spring Song



The cat's paw is in the wave.
The mouse ship is bound for the grave.
The sailors all are sleeping.
The sailors all will sleep.

The wolf maw is in the water.
The bobbing boat is a rabbit's daughter.
The water wolves are eating.
The wolfen all will eat.

The moth's wing is unfolding the sun.
The pink in the flower has barely begun.
The irises are singing.
The iris all will sing.

The heart's spring is in the meadow,
the harvesting will surely follow
what sowers all are bringing,
what lovers all will bring.



~May 2013




posted for     real toads
Open Link Monday




Process Notes: Yes, I read myself to sleep with Yeats last night.

Image: Irises, by Vincent Van Gogh, 1889
Public domain.

30 comments:

  1. I like the images and mystery of the second stanza, appreciate the word play and the rhythmic sounds. The line "The moth's wing is unfolding the sun"...it and the line following are perfect.

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  2. fascinating form you used in this...the end lines are jarring in a sense... The bobbing boat is a rabbit's daughter.
    The water wolves are eating....my fav part...stellar write joy...smiles.

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  3. Love this hymn to spring - the images and rhythm are wonderful. K

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  4. stunning visuals and story. your steady repetition is softly engaging and would make this a luxurious bedtime read. I esp. got piqued by the wolfen and the moth wing unfolding the sun. delicious work.

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  5. Ah, dry land has its charms, as the iris could have told you.

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  6. There''s a lullaby aspect here to the repetition, and like many lullabies a deeper and more grave kind of rocking going on. As much Shakespeare as Yeats, I thought -- somehow the lines "full fathom five thy father lies" coming to my mind, and the transformations of that. What was especially interesting to me is the different significance of the second near-repeat line - the sailors will sleep brining up (to me) death, while the sailors all are sleeping felt far more innocent = similarly, a kind of darker side to the wolfen will eat. I also really like the naturalist sort of shapes you use where a cat's paw drawing in and surging out really is very wavelike - I should say that in reverse - the wave like the cat's paw.

    Is it "mothlike stars are on the wing?" I can't remember right now, but here the moths themselves are unfolding the sun, which is lovely especially when one thinks of how moths are drawn to the light - but then there is that darker side - for me, anyway of them getting a bit burned by it! So a very lovely interplay here of that light and dark - the sowers and the lovers such a wonderful transposition here - as they are as much of a piece as the others. Anyway, just terrific. Very beautiful. - I am still traveling (sort of) through arrived back in NYC last night, but do not have my computer, so somehow get shunted to outlawyer. (And sorry for typos - I think there is a fair amount of weird auto-correction on the mobile devices.) k.

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    1. PS - I wanted to note a neat thing with the Irises too -- of course, you've got the flower here, but there's the eye too that will sing, in its odd occular tones. k

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    2. Thanks, k. The first chorus is kind of going for cause and effect, so you nailed the mood. I actually also scribbled a whole confused poem about a moth before I wrote this, and it had the flame element in it--maybe it will someday go beyond draft--and that was I think still lurking around somewhere when I wrote that stanza. Hope you and your devices land safely, and as I said before, I always enjoy savoring the pun-ishment of the Outlawyer sobriquet.

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    3. PS - just saw your quote from Plato at top (not of poem of blog). Agh. So true. So terrible. k.

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    4. Yes, it's a good quote, thanks, k--though also not a comfortable one. Too many people ignore or forget that we are fighting a war, and so are others all over this globe, and people are suffering every day in the name of profits, politics or religion. Makes me ill.

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  7. I love Stanza 2! And Stanza 3 is so beautiful. It's like it reclaims possibility and magic after all the hurtful things have ended.

    "The moth's wing is unfolding the sun." ... I really like this line because logic says "the moth's wing is unfolding in the sun," which is what I first pictured. But no, the tiny, seemingly insignificant, delicate moth has more power than any of us could possibly imagine. Even to unfold the sun, an entity we completely revolve around and think of as having the ultimate power. The sun doesn't even begin to function properly without the gentle flutter of the moth's wing, an invitation for the sun to exist. This is so incredible to me, reminding me that even the least of these have utmost purpose and effect on the world around them.

    No one should ever flog a seahorse. They are precious and should be preserved at all costs.

    ~henna

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  8. Outlawyer took the words right out of my mouth! Amazing, eh?

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  9. delightful melody.beautiful song.

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  10. This is great, Joy, a little bit frightening, a whole lot beautiful.
    K

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  11. Fantastic imagery and wonderful composition great job!

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  12. This is gorgeous - a melody, a painting, a patchwork of life and coloured with Spring.

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  13. The gathering, bringing, making are all too soon in harvest, but there is a kind of joy in these quicklyrhyming couplings. I am lingering at the picnic, but I feel a couple of tears.

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  14. Wonderful images, enjoyed the repetition

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  15. This is so beautifully and lyrically written, and I love the repetition. Irises are my fave flower. Altogether, I loved every line of this!

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  16. Thank God VVG shared the fire-flames of his talent with the world. (He could not have NOT!)

    And thank God, that after you went to sleep with Yeats--I mean reading Yeats, you awoke to give us your talents of beauty in descriptive elegance, slight mystery, and song!

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    1. Thank you Steve--hope you had a great visit with Brian.

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  17. I really enjoyed reading this. Lyrical and lovely and spring-y without being too glossy and twee.

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  18. Delicious, like trying an exotic dish for the first time.

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  19. There's a dreamy "call and response" character to the first two lines and each finishing couplet. This has a fine progression of imagery and imagination from the grim cat and mouse game in the first to the sense of potential in the last. This is a fine display of dark and light, well developed from start to finish and not needing another word. Very nice job.

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  20. Lyrical and magical, hedgewitch. I wonder if your dreams were as beautiful? :)

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  21. So full of music...beautiful work...What a wonderful way to seek sleep. I too wonder if your dreams are beautiful.

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  22. I'm liking it, H.W. Seems to me as a crazy mixed up put-together puzzle where the wrong pieces fit perfectly together. My favorite line is "The water wolves are eating." This is one that for sure I cannot visualize and it bugs the snot out of me in a teasing way. I will remember it for a long time.

    I hope you have it in you bring an equally brilliantJune 2013 poem. Thank you.

    BTW, we stayed for a week a few years ago at St. Remy, where Van Gogh admitted himself after cuttting his own ear off.
    http://jimmiehov.blogspot.com/search?q=van+gogh
    Van Gogh is probably my favorite artist.
    ..

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  23. Love this, Hedge. First recognizing the van Gogh, I knew I was is for something special. Seems as though that first stanza was the jumping-off point for your whole form. Starting off with the bleak, the feasting... then settling in to the irises, and finally the harvest (and the lovers, who will no doubt take refuge in the fields before the work begins!).

    This is lush, a bit moody, and great writing. Amy

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'Poetry is an echo asking a shadow to dance' ~Carl Sandburg