Sunday, March 2, 2014

Winter Fog







"The mind-is not the heart.
I may yet live, as I know others live,
To wish in vain to let go with the mind-
Of cares, at night, to sleep; but nothing tells me
That I need learn to let go with the heart.”
~Robert Frost





Winter Fog
A Roundel


The fog came slow pretending
very softly it was snow,
all white and never-ending.
The fog came slow.

All the things I didn't know
were lost in undefending
silhouetted frozen glow;

their beacon was a friending,
a breath of blue to blow
scope, light and comprehending.       
Still, fog was never snow.





~March 2014 











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Challenge: A Birthday In March: Robert Frost












Images: Top: Winter Fog, 1895, by Arkhip Kuindzhi
Public Domain via wikipainting.org
Footer: Snow, 1936, by M.C.Escher
This artwork may be protected by copyright. It is posted on the site in accordance with fair use principles. via wikipaintings.org






33 comments:

  1. I like the way your roundel mirrors the Frost quote, but in its own way. Gloomy grumpy old Frost might well have warmed to this piece, addressing as it does the subject of winter weather, a common theme of his.

    Personally, I love how the words just roll off the tongue. This needs to be read aloud, I think.

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  2. When fog is snow and both.. yes I know that very well ... when you are up in the mountain and fog and snow come together in a total whiteout.. it's scare yet amazing.. I have on occasion walked right to a house, and not seen it until it was right in front of me... scary,, and as a metaphor this can work in great ways.. fog pretending it was snow... wow---

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  3. First, I love the visuals you have chosen--very lovely--the Escher a particular surprise to me.

    Then - this fits so beautifully with the quote I think, as the distinction between fog and snow is something like the mind-is and the heart. I love that Frost used that mind-is--The hyphen is so terrific there - since in one brief stroke he changes the word from mind to something far more complex and deep -- (for me anyway)--and this difference between the worries and concerns of mind-is and the worries and concerns of the heart is quite intense and wonderful--one to be transcended, one not to be taken lightly--

    So, your poem works in a similar kind of parallel for me--the fog a kind of confusion itself, not just a masquarade--and this confusion that it throws over the I - who undefends in the wonder and beauty of snow--at least I think snow is a relatively positive here==though it has its own cold and maybe greater sharpness-- anyway -- wonderful lyricism too-- and seeming simplicity -- all very Frostian--I have some ideas about commas, which I am going to keep to myself. (Ha.) K.

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    1. O no--the transgression of the commas again! I actually almost used a dash in several places. I wish I knew which poem of Frost's that comes from--I found it at the goodreads link that Kerry gave us. I have to admit I am not normally a big fan of his. Thanks k--yes fog/snow/mind/heart--all the interrelating and each identity complex and one can never really say where one stops and the other starts, even if the before and after are crystal clear.

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    2. Dashes would add a dash of Dickinson. But keep as is! I rather like Frost, but maybe because I've only read a few and they have such strong personal associations. K.

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    3. I found the full Frost poem, which is utterly bizarre (I think). It is called Wild Grapes.

      It does have a kind of charm, but is really quite unexpected. Here's a link. http://glenavalon.com/wildgrapes.html. I'm going to doublecheck to make sure it is really Frost, but I don't think someone else could make it up. k.

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    4. A better link--with stanzas divided. http://www.bartleby.com/155/15.html

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    5. Gosh, I've just read only the first stanza of it and it is indeed...unexpected. Also a tad bit mindblowing for my preconceptions of Frost--I also have not read him terribly much, only his most public stuff. That first stanza makes my poem look like a child's drawing.

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    6. On the whole, I think bizarre is the right word.

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  4. 'Still, fog was never snow.'...love how the pretensions get caught in no time...

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  5. I'm pleasantly puzzling over the meaning of this poem. Really like the roundel form, and fog is a terrific theme for the form, the way it rolls in and out, folds over....

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    1. Thanks Mark, and it can mean anything you'd like it to mean--it's as amorphous to me as it is to you.

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  6. I love it, it does make justice to Frost's quote, you are a terrific poet. Whenever I come here, I must say, I feel teribly dumb, I can't write comments as smart as the ones your other readers leave, but I try my best to say how much I like what you write, words often fail me.

    Kiss.

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    1. Thank you, Kenia. I always appreciate your comments, and you are a very gifted poet yourself--I appreciate that even more. I'm glad you enjoyed this one.

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  7. Joy Ann, very nice roundel. Love the opening, it is very creative. I know the feeling of being surrounded by fog lately.

    Pamela

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    1. I'm sure you do, dear pamela. I hope you get some sun and air when you are ready for it. Thanks for taking the time to read.

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  8. they both blot out the world...the fog though i find mysterious...snow, well that gets a full range of emotion...its supposed to snow here tomorrow (never mind it is 60 today) up to 3-8 inches...seriously...this weather is screwed up. ha i like the playful last stanza...a little allit mixed in too...no it is not...

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    1. We're having, bless our souls, thundersleet here, temps around 11 degrees, and yeah. last week it was 68. Good luck on the 3-8 inches.

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  9. brilliant as light on snow, I say.

    And to the link K found - it seems to be summed in that final line: "That I need learn to let go with the heart" ~

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    1. Yes, the poem seems to be about letting go, about having to learn it, about 'scraping the bark' off your palms. Thanks, M.

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  10. I read this internally, and then aloud. It is beautiful, moving like soft, rolling fog.

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  11. YOu rarely use rhyme HW but this is as close to a perfect use of rhyme as I have seen. I like that you chose to write in different style but capture the same sentiment as the Frost poem.

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  12. Joy, every time I visit, I am in awe and I look at all I do not know--that is a good thing I think--your piece feels so like the Frost quote you choose. Brava!

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  13. Yes, this would be an excellent out-loud featured...so smooth...the tone and mood are unfaltering and your words hang in the mind in the very fashion of this mysterious glow. Beautiful write, Hedge!

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  14. One of my favourite (perhaps the favourite) poems of Frost is the 8-line "The way a crow shook down on me.." And this contains for me the same gentle rhythm, the same feeling of being at peace with nature, even at its most unforgiving.

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  15. Sorry about the deleted comment, got so caught up in poetry I didn't make it to page's bottom. I read your poem aloud this morning ... incredibly beautiful and altogether fitting for the weather in my part of the world ...

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    1. No problem, Helen--i appreciate you starting over again--and I appreciate your kind words. It's a white world here this morning, too.

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  16. Your Winter Fog takes me to Frost's Fire and Ice. Brevity, rhyme, and subtle nuances. And, then to his Snowy Evening. I was especially taken with your first stanza and admired how you played it out through the remaining lines. A beautiful piece.

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    1. Thank you, Jane. Your thoughts and insights are always of value to me.

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  17. This comes at me on little cat feet. :-)

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    1. Sandburg and Frost sort of run together in my mind. Thanks, TUG.

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  18. Oh, my.
    Hedge, this leaves me quite breathless. Just absolutely gorgeous in both language and imagery. Wonderful.

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'Poetry is an echo asking a shadow to dance' ~Carl Sandburg