Friday, January 31, 2020

Friday Flash Fiction 55 for January, 2020





Welcome all, to our first Friday 55
of the new year.
 
On the last Friday of every month, I will once again host the opportunity to have both a kick-ass weekend and share a poem, piece of prose poetry or short fiction on any subject; 
in fact, whatever, 
so long as it's in the form of 55 words, no more, no less. 

The prompt will be live from Friday at 12:00 AM til Sunday at 4:00 PM. 

This is an informal sort of place, so there's no Mr Linky. Just copy and paste a link to your 55 in the comments.

Here's a link to the html code for those who like to leave a short and neat one word link.




Here is my own contribution:








 Widow's Wind


One marriage that burned,
another that froze,
one dead-alive so long ago,
a breath of dream for a child to grow;

all lost in the time-storm's
 rosemary-spice,   
all holocaust
with an angel's form,
and a devil's price.

But a silence of moon,
the windowing woods,
a widowing wind,
ink's sudden flood;

these now are good.




~January 2020














The 55 is a writer's challenge in exactly 55 words, initiated years ago by Galen Hayes, and when he passed on, continued at various times by The Imaginary Garden with Real Toads, Kerry O'Connor, and by me. When I began doing this prompt in 2017, I wrote a lot about my feelings for it and for poetry blogging. If you'd like to read the background material, you'll find it here, in my Friday 55 Preamble Wanderings.  Unfortunately, the prompt will not be weekly at this time.



Images in order of appearance:  55 chevy pick up truck, via internet, manipulated, fair use
Mountain Fire,  1903, ©John Singer Sargent. Public Domain
Cottage On Fire At Night, circa 1750, ©Joseph Wright. Public Domain

 

39 comments:

  1. I have not had cofveve yet, but I will be back to read and link! :-)

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  2. Yours mad me somewhat sad Joy. Too many relationships into the wind that now have their results found in blow back.


    I forgot how difficult it can be to write this concisely. After 3 or 4 starts I finally got something from the nothingness. I have though entirely forgotten how to leave a link in a comment box.

    http://themanwhowalksalonewalksfaster.blogspot.com/

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    1. Thanks, Mark. You made me smile first thing this morning, albeit more of a grimace. BTW, here's the html link code : Links

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  3. I have two reactions to your poem, dear BFF. One is to slide slowly off my chair and collapse in a heap of admiring stunned-ness at how you put that together,how really perfect and honest and amazing it is. The final stanza, set up by the first two, is redemptive and spoken--for some reason I hear it spoken--with words so beautifully chosen and arranged that it made me cry. Honestly, this got to me big time. Reaction 2: up yours, show off! (except you;re not showing off, you're telling like it IS.)

    Uh, here's my trifle, which I was quite happy with until you blew my little poetic boat right out of the water.

    https://fireblossom-wordgarden.blogspot.com/2020/01/coffee-girl.html

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    1. Thank you so much, Shay. I think there's something about the 55 that almost makes you write to your highest, if you take it seriously--all the cutting and editing of thoughts boils them down to what they really are when they are naked and alone. I loved your 55--the truth in it was like cream that enters and disperses becoming one with the whole, and it was as sustaining as that first morning cup, even though what it had to reveal was the kind of honesty that can break your heart.

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  4. Goodness this strikes me right in the heart. To express so much emotion so eloquently in 55 words is a talent I wish I possessed. My poem was inspired by the image with it. It’s tough for me to write in 55 words. lol

    https://blackinkhowl.blogspot.com/2020/01/invidious.html

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    1. Thank you so much, Susie. Yours was striking, and what a great image to work from!

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  5. I am working on my 55, Joy. I got to 50 words and now I have hit pause, so I may only complete it on the morrow. Thank you for hosting our favourite prompt and also for the info on how to embed a link. After all the years, I have never known how to do it!

    Your poem has brought a lump to my throat, even as it presents its marvel of phrasing and imagery:

    the windowing woods,
    a widowing wind

    So very good indeed.

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    1. Thank you Kerry. You are most welcome, whenever you get here.

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    2. I have something to show today, though it still has that unfinished quality about it.. not sure it says what I wanted to say!

      https://kerryoconnorsother.blogspot.com/2020/02/a-skylover-wordlist-sufferance-at-dawn.html

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    3. If I read correctly, your poem seemed quite complete, and the diffuse presentation just added to its depth. Its always difficult to judge our own writing, because we have insider knowledge of all we are leaving out/pumping in/trying to find, and the choices are hard--thanks for being on board for the first 55 of this new and tumultuous year.

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    4. Thank you, Joy. I appreciate your thoughts and views on my poems.

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    5. And vice versa, Kerry. Your comments and support are part of what makes blogging poetry worthwhile.

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  6. Joy, your poem hits me in the heart, too. I would have to repeat it back to you, but the windowing wind and the silence of moon are especially amazing. I am glad for what now is good.I am so happy to be reading you again. Here is my 55: I am playing music with wolf howls in it as I write. Smiles.

    https://stardreamingwithsherrybluesky.blogspot.com/2020/01/wolf-sky.html

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    1. Yes, being glad for the good we can find is needful these days. Thanks for playing, Sherry.

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  7. Sorry, widowing wind..........I clicked on link but didnt know what to do with it...????

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    1. It's entirely optional, Sherry. Some people like to leave a one word link, and that page tells you how, using html code. I'm fine with copy and paste.

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  8. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  9. Sorry for the mistake and deletion in my post above. Here's my contribution. Thanks for hosting, Joy.

    https://excursionsanddiversions-sking.blogspot.com/2020/01/window.html

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  10. "Ink's sudden flood;/ These now are good. Contemplation and expression (and time) allow us to create our proper and workable perspectives. Beautifully developed.

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    1. Thanks, Steve. Yes,letting things fall into place requires patience, acceptance and other of the more passive virtues no longer encouraged in our society. And for the comment above, I enjoy hosting, and am glad to do it, but you're very welcome.

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  11. A third homonym for your final stanza's sweet pile: A winnowing. That is this poem, separating what has to pyre from what is still fire. I never doubted you would find a winter's heat in that widowing wind. I know I'm the oblahdee oblahdah rhyme guy, but isn't there such charmed power in winding it up so? If just for the words themselves, which unfortunately aren't enough to get us through the night but then maybe that's the point. I know it's only poetry, but its good enough to keeps the windowing clean for next poem's deeper sight and sigh. That's the affirmative stillness I draw from this poem, even as the homonyms keep resounding their magnitudes. Well done and thanks for the challenge. Weird times but not bad.

    I wasn't sure I had the right 55 to post here, but it's stubborn so here goes: https://blueoran.wordpress.com/2020/01/31/elixir/

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    1. Very much the right 55. They are all experiments, in their way, in distilling the most out of the least, a lesson I need to repeat often myself. Thanks for your insightful reading of this effort of mine--rhyme is a support but also a serviceable scaffold on which the poem can climb higher. Its very tendency to treacly predictability enforces a discipline that helps with heavy construction, imho--if done right--I'm sure the bards understand. Thanks for participating, B, and I hope to have something for your open link soon.

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  12. Your poem is spectacular, Joy. Hits me hard. Wonderful.

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    1. Thank you, Marian. If you come up with anything over the weekend, I'd love to read it.

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    2. I wrote! Thanks for offering this, Joy. xo
      http://www.runawaysentence.com/2020/02/heart-root.html

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  13. Wonderful poem! Here is my attempt: https://charmedchaos.com/2020/02/01/she/

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  14. Great you are here! Beautiful poem.

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    1. Thank you dear Ayala. Always good to "see" you!

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  15. I'm so glad you're resurrecting the 55, and leaving it open all weekend! I didn't want to miss it, but have been traveling w/o my computer. Your Widow's Wind must have blown right into my eyes, for it left me in tears.
    Here's my 55:
    https://othermary.wordpress.com/2020/02/01/communicating-with-the-dead-in-55/

    And now I'm off to read the others.

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    1. Yours spoke volumes for me, Mary. I'm so glad that you were able to play, and of course, my best wishes for a kickass weekend.

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  16. Wordpress wont let me comment, so i will try again tomorrow from my computer. Am enjoying all the 55's.

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    1. Sorry you are having difficulties, Sherry. I enjoyed your earlier comment very much. Thanks for the 55 support.

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  17. Joining late ...

    Here is mine https://brudberg.me/2020/02/02/jack-of-spades/

    Your poem to me, talks so strongly about death and maybe also of us living on in the absence of those that have left.

    T he rosemary reference made me think of Emily Dickinson and her poem "essential oils are wrung, ending in the lady lies is ceaseless rosemary.

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    1. Thank you Bjorn. I'm not familiar with the Dickinson, but of course rosemary is the herb of remembrance.Thanks for the reference,and for joining in on the 55 this week.

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"We make out of the quarrel with others, rhetoric, out of the quarrel with ourselves, poetry." ~William Butler Yeats