Thursday, August 19, 2021

Blue Drown

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Blue Drown
 
 
I've been too long
in the blue drown
to feel again now
 
too long under
the mirrorglass glowmoon
that tides me apart
to answer your voice
 
too many waves
with their concrete hands
on my throat
their sucking salt drench
in my eyes and mouth
to ask who's to blame.
 
There's no pain left
on this sand 
swirled trashed beach
where I've come to meet
 
the last falling star,
the hungry crabs.
 
 
 
 
July 2021 
 





 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 posted for Open Link Night at
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Images: Looking For Crabs Among The Rocks, 1905 © Joaquin Sorolla  Public Domain
Two Crabs, 1889  © Vincent Van Gogh       Public Domain
I have manipulated both images.
 
 
 
 
 
 

28 comments:

  1. Don't fear crustaceans, as Blue Oyster Cult once sang. Forgive the flippancy--it distresses me to see you writing so hopelessly about things, to the point that I hardly know what to say in response. Interesting that you invoke the tide, at whose mercy the crabs also are. Write it out, girl, as you are doing here, and that may lighten things as it often does when we put things down in poetry.

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    1. Thanks, Shay. This is primarily about not being able to write for so long. So I wrote about it. ;)

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  2. Ahh, I feel this. I feel like I'm drowning in this poem--a testament to your writing abilities and talent. Figuratively, I look at this as drowning, sinking into our own mental health for the worse, be it anxiety or depression; and I love how you communicate it with sea and beach imagery. That's amazing and it really draws you into the piece. Such beautiful, mesmerizing work!

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    1. Thank you very much. It's a trying but also fascinating time to be alive. Appreciate your thoughts.

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  3. Wow, very powerful emotions here: being in the blue drown, the waves concrete hands on the throat, and the whole of the last stanza:

    "There's no pain left
    on this sand
    swirled trashed beach
    where I've come to meet

    the last falling star,
    the hungry crabs."

    Stunning! Beautifully put. And I love the accompanying images you've chosen too, especially the Van Gogh. They complement the poem so well :-)

    Sunra Rainz

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  4. "This is primarily about not being able to write for so long. So I wrote about it. ;)"

    yeah, been there, done that. but you managed to turn it into a poem, and a good poem to boot. breathe... the most important thing is to breathe... no rush... no worries. these are my favorite lines:

    "too many waves
    with their concrete hands
    on my throat
    their sucking salt drench
    in my eyes and mouth"

    but all of these lines were good

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    1. Thanks for understanding so well, and for your generous read, Phillip. I'll be by in the morning to see what you've posted.

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  5. I love the use of "drown" as a noun, and the comparison of "concrete hands." Wow!

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  6. A blue drown of atmosphere but I'm glad you got yourself to shore. Maybe once the waterloggness subsides, things will be better. I think I see some kids down the shore there rolling a beach ball that is being chased by a wet puppy...

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  7. Yes, where there are beaches, there is always the possibility of puppies, and that's a good thing. Thanks.

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  8. This is a desolate landscape, but how beautifully and skilfully you paint it!

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  9. Hiya Hedge, good to see you out. Such precarious magic involved in the next poem, how we find it, if we can, how to throat what must change (Wallace Stevens). Who knows? In times that are SO unpropitious (Eliot). But we find a way to sing to "the last falling star / the hungry crabs." Because whatelsearewegonnado? (Tony Soprano). The poetry is done with us when it decides. Anyway, IMO you never left. Here's to what comes next. -b

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    1. Thanks, B. I haven't been able to open my throat for awhile, but I've decided I need to look harder for the voice. I still have dreams that whisper in their foreign languages. It's only a matter of translating, right? Thanks for stopping by.

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  10. This is exquisitely drawn! I especially like; "too long under the mirrorglass glowmoon that tides me apart to answer your voice." Words cannot deny at Poet long! 💝💝

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  11. Welcome back,
    "their sucking salt drench
    in my eyes and mouth"
    You have lost none of your considerable talent for striking imagery...JIM

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  12. Dear Joy, If this is what it's like to write after a hiatus .... color me gone! Seriously, your talent could never be dimmed ... never. This poem is proof positive, I am in awe.

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    1. Thanks, Helen. I always appreciate and look foward to what ypu have to say about my poems.

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  13. I am so glad to read you again. The melancholy is so beautiful, like the emotion of grey solemn waves on a deserted beach. Part of me thought about "the unbearable lightness of being" (the title not necessary the book)...

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    1. Thank you, Bjorn. A great book/title and flattered to think this might invite comparison to either.

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  14. The beauty of your verse over shadows your pain.

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  15. it's funny not funny - I live so close to the ocean but rarely visit. the blue drown floats within me, I think, so why be reminded? those crabs are voracious - it's good to turn the tables once in a while ~

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"We make out of the quarrel with others, rhetoric, out of the quarrel with ourselves, poetry." ~William Butler Yeats