Wednesday, September 28, 2022

Fairy Tale

 


 
 Fairy Tale





Princess Moonzumi and Prince Heart-of-Ash
were betrothed as children through a looking glass.
She never knew him. He never saw her,
just a shadow that moved in the mirror's blur.

Prince Heart-of-Ash learned bard song and sword,
to jest with a blade and kill with a word.
Princess Moonzumi went out every day
to dance with the Sidhe where the dogwoggles play
 
down in the mud, up in the scud,
around the green tree that sheds no blood.
She knew every fae in the wild dark wood
and they taught her to fear the evil in good.
 
Princess Moonzumi and Prince Heart-of-Ash
were married in autumn when the east winds thrash
as the leaves fell like fire on earth's mirror-face,
and they loved each other for a year and a day.
 
Then Prince Heart-of-Ash took his sharp bright blade
down to the wood where the dogwoggles played.
The princess died like a mouse in the leaves
for a lie in the heart only ash could believe.
 
 


September 2022










posted for earthweal's
 
 
 

and 
 
 
 
dVerse Poets'








Sidhe/SHē/noun, plural noun: Sidhe: the fairy people of Irish folklore, said to live beneath the hills and often identified as the remnant of the ancient Tuatha Dé Danann.









Note: I wrote the seed of this poem while running a fever a few weeks ago, but the prompts shaped it to final form. Apologies if I have stretched the boundaries a bit on what was requested.



 
 
Images: Mammal in Leaves, author unknown, courtesy of earthweal   Fair Use
They went hand in hand in the country that smells of appleblossoms and honey,  © Arthur Rackham, Irish Fairy Tales
 Fair Use

23 comments:

  1. What a pleasure to read you again, Joy. Wonderful allegory and also like that ending Yeats quote.

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    1. Thanks, Lisa. I'll be around soon to see what you've been up to while I've been out of the fray.

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  2. No wonder the sid-folk think we're all asholes. Lovely charm wound up in the conceit of "the evil in good" -- what do mortals know of either? Fitting that Heart-of-Ash learns bard song and sword play. I love it that someone went with that lil' hedgehog (did you come up with "dogwoggle"?) Just one question -- aren't the line of folk descended from this coupling called bazoombas?) -B

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    1. Ha! Only the females. The males are known as gabblesnatches. No I can't claim the word dogwoggle,. It comes from one of my silly video games, but I do claim the first usage of it in verse. ;_) I am amazed to learn(and now readily see) that is a hedgehog and not a mouse. Ah, well. Poetic license. Thanks for reading, B. Hope I didn't stray too far from the prompt.

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    2. Gabble, gobble, why quibble? I think you nailed the proompt.

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  3. "to fear the evil in good" that is so good! I love how you spun this fairy tale and it is very interesting that you mention dogwoggle. I thought he was some gaming character.

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    1. He is. But I am amazed anyone else has heard of him. It's just a great word. Thanks, Punam, for reading, and hosting.

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  4. What an amazing story. I love the "dogwoggle", and especially enjoyed the faultless rhyme scheme which sang the lines down the page. A wonderful read, Joy. Loved it.

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  5. "earth's mirror-face"--reflecting back to us all that is. We label it, but that does not change its substance. (Kerfe--both blogger and wordpress refuse to recognize me much of the time now...)

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    1. Kerfe, thank you. I had the same problem til I went into my browser and changed the cookie settings--you have to set it to allow all sorts of cookies. They have updated security parameters to the point of ridiculous overkill.

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  6. Beautifully crafted ballad, Joy, could almost hear it sung, where the end is known from its beginning and the tragedy's all the more rending.
    ~ Dora

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  7. I adore that opening stanza. That's just perfection, and also the part about jesting with a sword and killing with a word. It's wonderful stuff, Joy, and it's always a treat when you rhyme and/or go into mytholgu and folklore for inspiration. You know, this story reminds me of a version of "Tom Dooley" (not the old pop version) that i am almost certain you've never heard. Here it is, if you're curious:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3tINOomhJNA

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    1. Thanks so much Shay. It's the kind of rhyme that just falls out of my head without my consent, and I try not to do it all the time, but this time I ran with it. Glad you enjoyed it.

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  8. Taking the fae seriously as well one should. Loved it just as much at the second read.

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  9. Well I enjoyed every second of that and I care not a jot if it is prompt abiding or not. It took me on a dance into the world of the sidhe, the fae, duality and more.... and I had a sense that the ending would have a bump of some kind....as it did. Wonderful storytelling.

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    1. Thank you very much. Been too long since I've seen you here--thanks for stopping by.

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  10. fantastic and fantastical rhyme. you make us care about the inhabitants of this fae world in just a few strokes. the rhythm and meter superbly carry us along. this could easily be found in the pages of Grimm - and shine there, too. ~

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    1. Thanks, M. I read a lot of fairy tales as a child. They are not Disney. Hope all is maintaining in your world and all your news is good news.

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  11. I love this one... it reads like a murder ballad (I wanted to listen to "where the wild roses grow") but still with such a deeper meaning of the murder on nature and innocents lost.

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  12. Quite an incredible tale with seamless rhyming. Love the dogwoggles!

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"We make out of the quarrel with others, rhetoric, out of the quarrel with ourselves, poetry." ~William Butler Yeats

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