Tuesday, January 31, 2012

Raven and Stone





Raven and Stone



The raven holds
a found brightness in his claw
that his sharp beak
will never crack
yet he eyes it with
the very speaking soul
of possession,
one hunger set aside
while another feeds.

Winter with her cueball eyes
stares me down, professionally
grinding me grey, brushing me blue;
send me something green, love
something round and alive
to put in my raven’s claw,
not this old riddle
worn in my hair
that I will never crack

the petrified chrysalis
of a dead butterfly, the
forgotten classified secrets  
of two paper forms loving in code;
undelivered, undeciphered
folded apart in an alien cryptogram,
too afraid of ripping
to yield and make
one perfect origami.


January 2012



Posted for   OpenLinkNight   at dVerse Poets Pub






50 comments:

  1. "yet he eyes it with
    the very speaking soul
    of possession,
    one hunger set aside
    while another feeds."

    That is incredibly beautiful.

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  2. send me something green, love
    something round and alive
    to put in my raven’s claw,
    not this old riddle
    worn in my hair
    that I will never crack ...............


    Beautiful lines, beautiful poem!

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  3. love me some origami...was watching an origami artist in lucerne a while ago...and it was spellbinding what he created with tender moves.... love the poem hedge...esp. the last stanza is breath-takingly beautiful

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  4. nice...love the pool hall imagery there in the second...just dont slip into the pocket too early in the game you know...the imagery in the last stanza though is my fav...the dead butterfly shell...the too afraid to yiled and make something beautiful...like it hedge...

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  5. "two paper forms loving in code"???? Get the f*ck OUT of town. Only you could have written a line like that. Sometimes you pull a line like this out of your bonnet, and i just go "holy salamanders."

    That on top of the first stanza which is stellar.

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  6. Thanks all--I'll be linking in tonight but may not get much commenting done as my right arm has decided to throw fits--flare up of some old tendonitis, I think. Anyway, I will get by to read as soon as I can.

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    Replies
    1. I feel your pain! Don't dilute your recuperative powers at the keyboard this week...

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  7. My dear lady,
    you never cease to surprise me! The host at the pub tonight is not right concerning you...

    Hey! I hope your tendonitis vanishes as the raven takes off your place again...
    D.
    xoxx

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  8. Hedge, really good write. Love the final stanza, just so good. So many excellent lines throughout. Thanks

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  9. Thanks for the "Hugginn and Mugginn" tag, which takes me to the divide between thought and memory, ravens delivering the world's information back to Odin on separate strands -- strands which here are irreconcilable. History and mystery are indeed sometimes like inedible rocks, indigestible, "two paper forms loving in code." There's a Hugginn and Mugginn in every irreconcilable conversation, too, two takes, a world of difference. 'Tis a riddle, fer sure, a maddening one. Sorry to hear about the tendonitis. Advil and tea and hearthfire for you. - Brendan

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    1. Yes, we've all got that pair inputting. and reconciling the information can get tricky, but then the raven is a trickster, but at least it has enough soul to want more than just the liver of the next roadkill--well, that too. Tea & advil sounds like a plan. Thanks for reading, B.

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  10. yes, that is winter, perfectly described...always absorbing all the color, saving it for spring, and that ending, so perfect.

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  11. feels V.much like a distillation - which works well - cue ball eyes is great and the atmosphere flows from the lines enclosing the whole in an excellent vehicle for delivery - great picture choices close the deal - great stuff hedge

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  12. I loved this. Your words are so sharp and obviously delicately chosen.

    My son-in-law does origami. What a great form of art.

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  13. Your poetry is as always beautiful and clever..."winter with her cueball eyes" ..genius! Really hope your arm feels better soon. Sending healing vibes your way :)

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  14. This is perfectly honed and polished...the images of incompleteness lend a brilliant sadness to it all..the raven's bright toy, the unanswered riddle in the second stanza, the "unperfected origami"...what a wonderful metaphor that last is for an incomplete life. Excellent.

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  15. "one hunger set aside
    while another feeds..." YES.

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  16. I want to find a "found brightness" too.

    Have you tried sleeping in wrist braces for the pain upon typing? They cured my pre-carpal tunnel pain. You can get them at the pharmacy.

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  17. Loved this piece--especially the last stanza---and hope your arm feels better soon!

    @AudreyHowitt

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  18. The raven in myth carries much meaning. I like how you have used it here. Each of the stanzas seems able to stand on its own, the imagery strong (as always), the cadence controlled, the conception assured. Lovely!

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  19. this is the first of your poems I've read....new to dVerse Pub. Loved the lines,
    "Winter with her cueball eyes
    stares me down, professionally
    grinding me grey, brushing me blue;"
    I live in the Northwest; it does seem at times as if we are being ground down to grey.
    you are some word weaver!

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  20. I love all the colours of your words:

    grinding me grey, brushing me blue;
    send me something green, love
    something round and alive
    to put in my raven’s claw

    Hope your arm feels better ~

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  21. Hedge I love the first stanza. I play both the roles of the raven and the stone depending on the day. I prefer to be the stone.

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  22. Love those cue ball eyes! Now all you need to do is add the official theme song of origami enthusiasts worldwide: Bend Me, Shape Me.
    (By the American Breed.)

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  23. Good call, I like the strength and the intelligence the pebble gets. And then you fossilize it.

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  24. You take the totem crow and bring her alive in her somwhat sinister guise as harbinger of death, but here harbinger of winter's death. There's more than a little tricksterism going on in this crow's mind as you play nicely with the images of death, rebirth, renewal. I hear the echo of ancient charms in your words and I am enchanted by the way it transports me to a differen worldt, if only for the time of the poem. A journey in the sable feathers of the mantic bird!

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  25. Thanks everyone for your very generous and kind words tonight. The ice has helped, and I hope to be able to return the favor to all tomorrow.

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  26. Hi Joy--I found this very beautiful, but I must confess to being a bit stymied by the end. I am a terribly literal reader, but I couldn't be sure of what you meant by the paper forms--whether they were the wings of the butterfly (only it was a chrysalis), or two people or notes--I'm sorry to be dense, because I found most of the poem so delicate, and lovely, even the parts I couldn't understand. I pass this confusion on because you must know how much I like your work. K.

    Ps - glad your arm is better. I am constantly screwing up something or other with my overly exuberant attempts at exercise. (Ha.)

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    1. Two people, objectified. They and the chrysalis, are set up as (comparative)definitions of the riddle in the second stanza...their communications as lifeless as paper and pointless as code that can't be deciphered. Hope that helps. I normally try not to 'explain' my poems, because that then limits how people interpret them, and really, everyone does so differently, and to me that's a good thing. But I don't mean to be totally mystifying. ;_) Thanks for reading, K. Arm is much better after resting it.

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    2. No, thanks--I understand the reluctance to explain, and I don't mean to be so literal. It's just that I often think images and lines have a really specific meaning (as well as layers of reference) and that people (not you at all) can be a bit blase and careless about how the specifics connect. I know you are not careless, so I like to follow it through. K.

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    3. What an irritating reader! Sorry--

      I can see the code papers now--thanks. k.

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  27. >Winter with her cue ball eyes

    Chills ...

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  28. Great poem. I've had to read it numerous times and this is what it makes me think about:
    Why is it we collect those things which fascinate us to no real end except fascination? Then we move onto the next one without ever having enjoyed or understood the one before or just collecting them as if possessing them will feed us. We're strange creatures always wanting that which we don't have, always living for the next thing or season or moment. Been thinking about that lately how some days just blend as I wait for the next exciting thing to do or how I collect experiences, books, etc. without truly digesting some of them.

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  29. Wonderful to read, love the flow of the words, the imagery, the colors. :)

    Wishing you speedy recovery on that tendonitis. Rest it well.

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  30. Winter with her cue ball eyes

    This I could eat.... enjoyed the read thank you

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  31. to yield and make
    one perfect origami.

    Enjoyed the last few line the most. Nice word pic for me.

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  32. Irony and art play a role in tricking that inner paradox or cognitive dissonance that you so aptly put as an 'old riddle/worn in my hair/that I will never crack' so that we may be free to look for 'that something round and alive'. I have to admit to being excessively fond of the third stanza. Your adept play with metaphor, the slicing action of each movement of the poem, and the interweaving of mythological themes astounds me.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks for reading, Anna. Excellent interpretation. I will be around to visit and see what you've written here shortly.

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  33. It's so hard for two to become one...and that's what stayed with me reading this hedgewitch. Your imagery is always so fluid and beautiful. All the while I was reading this, Raven's cousin Crow, was shouting outside the window here.

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  34. The cold of blind stubbornness: 'a found brightness in his claw.' Perfect word placement and imagery work through like living origami. Beautiful and telling use of multiple images. Chilling.

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  35. This is an absolutely amazing poem - I am floored by the raven and stone metaphor, and the way that you wove the emotional context in and out until the end. Definitely bookmark-worthy.

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  36. Vivid visual and emotive cues to this - excellent.

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  37. Joy, so sorry you're in pain. Sending you healing thoughts. Your recovery is crucial. Work such as this has no parallel. Nothing I can say would expand its meaning or effect. I contend that you are still the Master. Always Excellent.

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  38. I must confess... as i read your poetry I feel more limited about what i write :) Not that your poetry offends me.. oh I feel how much more I must rise .. I liked this delicate piece woven so beautifully but still have to re-read it as I havent really understood Raven And Stone here .. your title.. Umm may be the simple and important part .. but apologies I think I havent got it right in my head..or may be its wedding preps making my mind boom boom and yes missing writing and offering in OLN too. But I am glad others have awesome stuff to share

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    1. Congratz on the wedding--that's enough to distract anyone. And thanks so much for taking the time to come by and read and comment--this is mostly a poem about attraction and loss, if that helps.

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  39. what a movement this poem has! the transitions in images, thoughts and then back again - it glides along most melodically! many great lines - a few - "professionally
    grinding me grey, brushing me blue;" and the subtle power in this "something round and alive" - and then the whole third stanza was just brilliantly compose! nice writing!

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    Replies
    1. Thanks, OT. Glad to see you passing through, and thanks so much for your input, and for reading.

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  40. Your posts to dVerse are becoming the highlight of my poetic week. So many memorable lines and treasured images. Humbling also to be in the presence of such talent and clear intelligence. Thank you Joy, James.

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  41. An emotive piece, Joy. Gorgeous writing as always.

    Pamela

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'Poetry is an echo asking a shadow to dance' ~Carl Sandburg