Thursday, November 1, 2012

2012 US Presidential Election~Vote!




December 10 march for voting rights





To all my readers, with apologies to those outside the US:

Yes, this is a poetry blog, but right now, for me politics is taking precedence. I will not be posting any poetry till after the Tuesday, November 6th election.

Disclaimer: This post represents my personal opinions and in stating them, I wish to acknowledge that I support the rights of all human beings to hold their own personal views and consider them as serious and real as I do mine, regardless of whether we are in agreement. 

There is a lot going on in our country right now to distract us from next week's  Presidential election, yet it would be a fatal mistake to think that it won’t be the single most important factor in our country's continuing economic recovery, and in our own personal lives in many subtle and not so subtle ways. 
 
It will determine whether the New Deal safety net of Social Security is there for your children, yourselves or your parents, whether Medicare and Medicaid and the health care reforms forcing insurance companies to stop denying coverage to sick people and to insure millions of additional Americans put through by President Obama remain in effect or are destroyed.

It will affect the future of public education, immigration policy, alternative energy investments and climate change, public safety and infrastructure, personal reproductive choices of women, the ability of LGBT couples to enjoy equal opportunity under the law, and many other issues central to our identity as a country of progress, freedom and equality. It will certainly affect our relationships with other countries, especially the Middle East, and the likelihood of war with Iran. 

In addition, whoever is the next president will determine the future composition of the Supreme Court, which in turn will be a determining factor in many landmark cases which will impact us all.

My left-leaning liberal politics are no secret, but to clarify, I have always considered myself more as an Independent, believing both sides in our time to be morally corrupt, and have in many past elections voted Republican. That party's extreme swing to the far right precludes any consideration of that this year, and I will be voting Democratic in this election. 

Nonetheless, regardless of which party, if any, you support, I urge you to find out the facts behind the hype wherever possible, and to vote your conscience.  


It's very easy to say that all politicians are corrupt and a vote doesn’t matter, but that's the biggest cop-out of all time. If people engaged with issues, paid attention to who  is saying what and educated themselves,  we would have a different class of people  running for office, and  power would not be in the hands of the wealthiest among us to the detriment of the rest of us. 


"OUR DEMOCRACY, VOTE!"

So  please, exercise a right people have died to protect, and  
GVote on Tuesday. 


Okay, I'm off my soapbox. Below are some informative, non-partisan links that may be helpful. Normal poetry will resume sometime after the election.

To find out information on where or how to vote in your state:


To verify the facts in ads or claims by candidates(non-partisan):


For the latest polling averages:

Real Clear Politics (leans slightly right)

Nate Silver's 538 Blog at the NYT (leans slightly left)


ENCOURAGE PEOPLE TO VOTE THIS UK GENERAL ELECTION MAY 2010




For image credits, hover mouse over picture. All images are shared under a Creative Commons License.


42 comments:

  1. Ha! Who knew you came with a disclaimer.
    I am sickened by how unimformed people allow themselves to be about gov affairs.
    The supreme court has 4 justices in their 70's. Ginsburg is 79 and has had cancer.
    This election is not just about the next four yrs, but the next 30.
    If people want to give up all that's been gained and go back to the 50's, they should vote republican.
    No more having to worry about women's or minority rights.
    All gone
    Jus sayin

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  2. Paul Ryan one heartbeat away from the presidency . . . need I say more?

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    1. Yep, just as scary as Sarah Palin, perhaps more so, I think.

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    2. Waaay more scary. Palin is just an idiot. Ryan is a believer.

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    3. I agree it would be way more scary. Now we don't have to worry about it. But we have to keep a watchful eye on his future plans, most definitely.

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  3. Shit!
    Forgot my disclaimer~
    The views expressed here by "whacko beyond the norm" do not in any way reflect or represent the views of the blog author "verse viper"
    Any assimilation of crazy is pure coincidence.
    ~rick

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    1. No disclaimer needed. My disclaimer out-disclaims your disclaimer, dude. ;_)

      Thanks for speaking up , rick. I was just trying not to be too obnoxious.

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  4. I support the personal right to vote, and believe it should be exercised whenever a democracy calls upon its people, but I have long given up the belief that politicians run their own countries in a free enterprise society (much like I have long given up belief in a god). Big business runs the world, and politicians are the puppets of Mega Corporations and multi-billion-dollar deals. It's all about maintaining the status quo of the super-rich, whichever country they call home.

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    1. Thanks for your input, Kerry. I agree that we are now living in a new Gilded Age, where unprecedented wealth(and the concomitant power) is held in the hands of less than 2% of the population. I want to believe the lessons of history, that determined effort, commitment and engagement can change that abysmal and unfair status quo now as it did circa WWII. I just hope it doesn't take a third World War to do it.

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  5. great post hedge....people should make informed decisions....not just listen to what the candidates say but actually look at their record...and or any time they have contradicted themselves....and look at the issues as a whole as well, and not be so focused on one that they miss other issues...you know i will be voting...

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  6. Great post, kiddo. I am holding my breath in Canada, as it matters GREATLY to us, and impacts us profoundly, who is the President of the USA. You listed all of the important issues, and I hope and pray President Obama gets another four years to follow through with what he has started. I worry greatly about the strength of the right-leaning faction in your country. Thanks for this informative post.

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  7. Here... here! Thumb's up on your post ... and a plea that citizens of the USA 'hear.'

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  8. "whoever is the next president will determine the future composition of the Supreme Court, "

    That is a HUGE deal. And Rick, voting Republican does not make me uninformed. ;P Thank you, Joy, for being a passionate voice and one awesome lady!

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    1. Thank you for listening, Margaret. It's a difficult time for all of us, and listening is much harder than shouting. But I do believe we all have more in common than we do that separates us.

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  9. As usual, great tunes. Not only an amazing talent, but one of the first things that comes to mind with SRV is passion. It's a feel I get from this post. It's cool you respect everyone's views. We have to work together to get stuff accomplished, I think. Voodoo Child is on my shuffle. It's had some pretty inspirational moments. Texas Flood is smokin too. I agree, Stevie rules, hands down. I think, I understand the theme of your selections. It's a nice tribute to those affected by Sandy. I hope that things will quickly improve for those folks too.

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    1. Good to see you, Scott, and glad you enjoyed the SRV. And the blues were made for times like these. (Had Voodoo Chile up for Halloween, until the storm--great guitar work on that one.)

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  10. With all due respect, Margaret. My comment said no such thing.
    There are many informed and unimformed on both sides.
    I apologize if i've offended.
    I merely meant that the stakes are high no matter how one feels, and the issues deserve study before a knee~jerk vote based on rhetoric.
    I respect your right to your views.
    ~rick

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    1. Thank you for apologizing and keeping the tone civil, rick. Margaret is not trying to bait you.

      I think the problem is the trend over the last twenty years, is that too many people get their information from the sources that say what they want to hear. That's fine, but we have to understand that there is an agenda behind those who want to dominate the air waves, and that news and opinion are separate boxes--getting the pertinent facts is just basic. Like you, I agree the issues are too important not to be taken seriously and studied impartially.

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    2. Rick I was not trying to bait you. It is just my sarcastic humor. Sorry. I have many issues that definitely cross political party lines. And health care NEEDS to be reformed. But... Therein lies the long, long discussion. Everyone should vote

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  11. Love the post. Informed, educated, thinking people is what we need to be. Sadly, people are swayed by a "good performance" at a debate or in a speech without understanding the consequences. People I've met in other countries are far more informed about American politics and issues than many Americans I know. If we were a country with more than two viable parties, not voting might be a valid protest. But we can't afford that option. I'm totally with you, and with Kerry, that who is president doesn't change the fact that our business interests run the world, and makes me sicker every year. However I do believe that one choice this election would "take America back" to the dark ages. Just for Obamacare alone I will vote Obama.

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    1. Thank you Ruth. You state your views sympathetically and eloquently, and of course you know how much I agree with them.

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  12. As my friend, you know my political views, dearie, such as they are. I shall miss your poems, and look forward to their return.

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  13. Hi Hedge - a soap box that is carefully measured and quite solid - not one of those cardboardy kinds and very respectful too.

    Of course you know where I stand. Our trip to Florida to work for Obama was cancelled as the flight fell through but my children are getting on a bus for Ohio tomorrow. I am very proud of them - I should probably hop aboard but am just too tired really and a bit much going on here -


    I do not think that people voting Republican are uninformed but I do think Mr. Romney has been tremendously inconsistant. He's taken so many different positions that it is impossible if you've followed him closely t know where he might land on a particular issue while in office, especially if the position were not popular with one group or another. And, of course, there are certain positions that I espouse that I feel quite certain he would not support -almost anything supporting women, veterans or the environment.

    I very much thank you for the cop-out remark which I was going to say on my blog. One of the most maddening things about living in NYC at 9/11 is that you were felt you were absolutely a political pawn. In that case, it was partly because the neo-cons had deliberately decided not to pay attention to anything that Clinton had paid attention to. And then when the Iraq War was started basically in the name of 9/11--it was just horrendous. A great slogan of the time for New Yorkers - Not in Our Name. We were so conscious of votes having consequences. A friend of mine who lived downtown a couple of blocks from the Word Trade Center actually left the country when Bush was re-elected - He was a lifelong New Yorker and was so upset at what he'd been through and seen in 2001 that he just could not stand it and moved to a completely different country when Bush got the second term. I could never do that - but I could understand how upset he was. k.

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    1. PS _ so sorry to make such a long comment. Got carried away. Please feel free to delete. k.

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    2. Thanks for your insight and input, karin, and much praise for your kids on their trip to Ohio--that's the kind of commitment that gets things done, and if politicians could, they would buy it, but they can't. Sorry you missed the trip to Florida, but I can only imagine how much is going on in your life right now and how tiring it all must be.

      I understand how appalling it must be to see things done in your name that you abominate, like the Iraq war. I think, though, that in the world's eye, those things were sadly done in all our names, and the shame belongs to us all for allowing it to happen. I earnestly hope and pray that Romney is not elected, because I agree completely with your assessment of his weathervane characteristics, and I believe he will not be in control of his presidency. That control will be in the hands of his financiers and 'advisors'--those who backed Bush, those who believe in war as a money-maker, those who believe voter suppression not responsiveness to voting constituencies, are the answers, will be in charge, and the only people that will gain are those who already have more than they need.

      Thanks for adding your opinion to the discussion, karin, and all my best thoughts your way that a life closer to normalcy returns soon to your wounded city.

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  14. I get carried away, too..suffice it to say that being passionate about something is better than indifference...I just happen to be passionate about Obama and a Democratic Congress that will get things done;)

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  15. "It's very easy to say that all politicians are corrupt and a vote doesn’t matter, but that's the biggest cop-out of all time. If people engaged with issues, paid attention to who is saying what and educated themselves, we would have a different class of people running for office, and power would not be in the hands of the wealthiest among us to the detriment of the rest of us. "

    That's well said, and thanks for saying it. Apathy got us here. And what you said to Karin about things done in our name resonates with me too. What I have trouble understanding is how easily we the people can be taken into major wars across the world - seemingly without our control - and yet it seems unthinkable that our so-called representatives in government can take us, lead us into a green and peaceful world. I ask with Dennis Kucinich: Why do we not have a Department of Peace?

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    1. Well, we have a State Department, and if it isn't already, that ought to be their job, to settle disputes, expose and work against factional aggressions which become wars, try to bring pressure on violations of international law and atrocities, and function as a Department of Peace. How effective such things are, and how often they just become, like the UN, political footballs, is affected strongly by all the other negatives in our politics. Thanks for reading, Mark, and for voicing your thoughts.

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  16. Brilliant commentary, Joy! I love your passion and think it could be contagious if this could be run in newspapers and all over the Web. I have done my part, as we have mail ballots here in Oregon and I voted (Democrat) as soon as mine arrived. I am on pins&needles about this election, and very concerned how Sandy is going to affect the outcome. Cold, hungry, frightened people who become more anxious by the day could mistake their plight as government-related, when, in fact, it is going to take more than I can imagine to put this right, and much longer than any of us would wish. This election is definitely historic in many ways. May grace visit us and sanity prevail.....

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    1. Thanks, Lydia. I just wish people would take the time to learn who and what they are voting for, to take all the lies and absurd promises, accusations and bombast and plug their ears to it, and vote in an informed way that benefits the country as a whole, not one specific ideology. I also am extremely uneasy about this election, especially in terms of process, and how difficult republican legislatures and governors are making it for people to vote. I dread another locked election where the Supreme Court, or even worse, the tea party republican House, decides who is president instead of the people whose lives are going to be directly affected.

      My main concern with Sandy is not that people will switch their votes, but that they may not even be able to vote due to their personal plights. It's going to be an extremely trying period, I think, waiting to see the ultimate result of this election.

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  17. I like Obama for your presidency.

    I hope you and rest of America will vote for him again ~

    All the best Hedge ~

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  18. Beautifully said! I'm very concerned about this election, to say the least!

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  19. Thank you for your thoughtful and heart felt post. I remember a day when the Republican party was a more reasoned one willing to work with Democrats to accomplish the common good. It's frightening how far right it has swung and how adamant to obstruct cooperation with this President. Despite Romney changing positions so many times, nominating Ryan as vice president made his underlying beliefs and intent clear. I'm not sure if women just haven't read what extreme positions Ryan has taken and espouses but he has and the implications for us, our daughters and granddaughters are scary. When will more centrist, representative voices regain control of one of only two parties in our political system? In the meanwhile, I will vote Democratic.

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    1. Thanks, Mary, for speaking up. I too remember when there was real dialogue possible and constructive compromises often happened between dems and repubs. It seems like another century--o wait, it was! ;-) I agree totally on Ryan, and the facts under Romney's facade are extremely ugly for anyone lifting up the rock and actually looking to see what's living there.

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  20. oh man, i am looking for an excuse to get out of voting and now i read this...
    :)
    very nice to see you again:)

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    1. No pressure, ed--but if Romney wins, it won't be because I didn't vote for Obama. ;-) Good to see you stop by--are you writing again?

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  21. I've been working to elect Obama for all of the reasons you gave above. I'm so tired of fighting and anticipating all the ways people could be discouraged from voting.

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    1. Thanks for your work, Susan. This is going to be a long night, I'm afraid.

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  22. Outside of the US people are very interested! :)

    Hello hedgewitch, this is oceangirl.

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  23. Great write up, Joy Ann. I see a big problem in the US being the low-information people. They have listened to Romney flip back and forth, and they still follow like sheep. Quite sad really. Who would have thought that in this day and age, the US could be fueled with such hatred of a man who's skin is not the right colour. My belief is just that, racism has peeked since Obama was elected. I have seen it in my own family, it is quite disappointing.

    Pamela

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    1. Yes, and though we won tonight, it was by the thinnest of margins. Still, I'm going to take it as a good sign, that our country isn't ready to roll over and become a total loss just yet.

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'Poetry is an echo asking a shadow to dance' ~Carl Sandburg