Monday, April 18, 2016

A Turn At The Asylum


A Turn At The Asylum





I was looking for the
miracle office when I
walked through the unlocked door to see
no trace of a sign, just
Monica at the front desk offering a full
line of cosmetics, lipsticks in drawers
red pink and black,
each shade sheathed, chicly
discontinued.

From the walls gazed the founders
benevolent and plump, framed
in pince nez and patents,
spats and Van Dykes. No strait jackets here,
just the soft pavane smoothing
the sensitive system of Dr Tarr
and professional stars
and a ceiling of doctoral feathers.

And there I found you,
the last thing I expected,
thick and hot and immediately tangled
between my legs when the warder
walked in, unaware of course for his secret
success was a modest mind, 
and kind.

While the cashier was distracted, 
divvying up the day's
proceeds,(bales of hay and clockwork bears
and a chiaroscuro Tintoretto) we slipped like smoke
out to the veranda, covered safe 
in the polka dot patter of
St John Stockworth Sinclair, whose plans
were about to quite soon
reach surprisingly lush fruition.

You found us a dry corner
on the freshly hosed concrete
and blew up yellow as a daffodil
our rubber bed of air
and the love we made there
was enormous, a theatre of smiles
and soft screams, for the whole point
of the miracle office is that
everyone gets their own dreams.


 ~April 2016






 posted for   real toads




Images:
The Grounds Of The Asylum, 1889, Vincent Van Gogh
The Madhouse, (Detail) 1814, Francisco Goya
Public domain






19 comments:

  1. I so love the poem which sounds light and happy... but when contrasted with paintings become a darker tale. To me the twist is more hinted, but so skillful is the ekphrasis when going from Van Gogh's warm colors to Goya's darkness it seems like you turn a dagger darkly... Wonderful.

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  3. Definitely a surprise ending! I loved it, Hedge. :)

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  4. wow, what a journey this one takes us on,,,but worth fulfilment at the end,,I don't claim to understand completely but the process is recognizable :-)

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  5. This is an astounding piece of satirical poetry. I shall never think of the Madhouse again without the pince-nezed patrons, and the pouty-lipped Monica. This speaks much of appearances vs reality, and a whole lot more besides.

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  6. Thanks for confirming that there is, indeed, a miracle office. Funny, dark, sexy! Enjoyed it immensely!

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  7. Wow! Marvelous writing and more fun than the sane are usually allowed.

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  8. I could use a Miracle Office, or a nuthouse, or *something* myself these days, I think. I loved the description of the founders. That was priceless.

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  9. Ok, this is the 3rd time I'm commenting because blogger is messed up for me.
    Your imagery--HOLY SHIT. In your face, demanding because they're so real you feel them and see them; ethereal and a feeling I got from that book Girl, Interrupted--that wallpaper in that creepy house. But your poem isn't creepy, it's pleasant and immediate and enchanting in a very modern way. EXCELLENT.

    You found us a dry corner
    on the freshly hosed concrete
    and blew up yellow as a daffodil
    our rubber bed of air
    and the love we made there
    was enormous

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    1. So glad you liked it enough to comment three times, Amy. Your words are deeply appreciated as honestly I wasn't sure about this one. BTW, I have comment moderation on, so all your comments were saved--you just can't see them till I publish them(stalker issues here...sigh) Anyway, thanks again for persevering. It was very well worth it for me to get your feedback.

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  10. Hey Hedge-- the whole thing is so marvelous really-- the strangeness of a dream where all seems absolutely unquestionable and authoritative and yet is turned on its head-- I am very glad that the concrete was freshly hosed and that dr. Tarr and the doctoral feathers were well disposed. that is all so smoothly done I found myself catching on it but not catching on-- and then beaming-- the Sinclair is sounding familiar but I can't think of it-- all works without references however k.

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    1. No real references, except those elusive threads that certain pontifical sorts of names arouse--I made everything up. ;_) Thanks a lot, k. for finding time and so glad you enjoyed it, even if it is not the clearest.(This actually was a very authoritative and explicit dream.)

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  11. Wow! Wonderful! I love all the clothing descriptions here.

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  12. This is amazing. I think I could use a miracle office also. I am in the need of several. I agree with Bjorn, painting and words combined take this a bit dark. Truth seems to come in that color.

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  13. You took this prompt and flew with it, kiddo.....a wonderful tale, culminating in my fave lines at the end: "The whole point of the miracle office is that everyone gets their own dreams." Sign me up!!!!!!

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  14. so I see Doc Tarr and his pince-nez and spats and this is *exactly* what I needed to read, right now, because I was very close. very close. last night at just shutting down my blog, fb, the whole shooting match, and saying f*ck it as I try to give my son the attention and time he and his brother so justly deserve.

    but then what?

    everyone needs an interlude, a smile, a traipse with the crazies because yes, we are... so thank you.

    btw, I got a comment on 17, not sure if you visited 18, but if you did, I didn't see anything... not that you need to or should. but since you asked... ~

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    1. No, I don't think Ive made it to 18, M--I had to do all the responses to my own prompt yesterday, the one from Sunday, and so I am a day behind. I will get there--I know how much difference it can make to have a little support, especially in April. I have been so close to that moment myself(of shutting down)--and I don't have the demands of job or children (just chickens) at this point, yet sometimes blogging truly seems overwhelming, and like a lot of navel-gazing that no one cares about but oneself--but if you have that need to write in you, you have to do it somewhere, and so here I still am. I would miss your work terribly if you left, so it isn't the vacuum it sometimes seems. I'm glad if the levity and the odd twisted grin here suited your mood--it was really just transcribing a dream, as my poems often are, but when I remember them like that, it seems I have to. Thanks for your very supportive comments, always.

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  15. So love the sounds in 'polka dot patter'. That zings. And the final drama ... that 'theatre of smiles and soft screams'... So alive and energetic... The Miracle Office is a heartland for yin and yang...

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  16. One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest meets Avon seller meets satire gone wild. This is a dark hoot, Hedge. In tone and impact, it reminds me of "A Modest Proposal".

    Wonderful.

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'Poetry is an echo asking a shadow to dance' ~Carl Sandburg