Sunday, June 5, 2011

Under the Purple Leaf



Under the Purple Leaf


Something about the faerie girl
the way she makes the green leaf curl
to show it’s purple blood within
then laughs beneath its tarpaulin,

something about her isn’t right
and yet she's perfect in the night,
her violet eyes that come and go
too bright, too wise in the briar shadow

as she steps her ivory feet, each toe
bends like wicker in her leafy shoe;
something about her smiling seems
to drift the air with breathing dreams.

She's so wicked soft and small
she almost isn’t there at all
under the tumbling  purple where
the moon casts darkness on her hair.

Something about the faerie girl
makes my northern neckhairs curl,
makes me back up pace by pace
and leave her here to own this place.



June 2011

Posted for   real toads
Open Link Monday



(Originally Posted for   OneShootSunday   at the inimitable OneStopPoetry)




Note: the photograph used for this prompt is no longer available for duplication,
but Purple Phase, by Rob Hanson, can still be viewed on
Rob Hanson's website

Current Image: Canna with purple crape myrtle foliage,
© joyannjones 2012





38 comments:

  1. Lovely poem Hedgswitch - purple is a colour of passion and I think you've caught that beautifully in this poem !! Steve

    ReplyDelete
  2. nice. love the playful rhyme scheme which sets you up nicely for the creepy feeling that grows by the end of the verse...something just isnt right eh...yeah...

    ReplyDelete
  3. 'Tis said the unconscious other person within -- anima, animus, Ourania, the Kelpie of Corryvreckan -- all fey folk -- live at the liminal edge where the veil between the worlds are thin. According to Jung, they are there to invite us Over and In, are personifications of Inwardness and Subjectivity, luring us to deep old lost places for better (poetry) or ill (madness). Always a bit of doubt whether it was boon or doom this one promises, crooking her finger in invitation, eerily laughing in the wonderveld of this florid poem. Do you really wanna go there? Merlin was enthralled by Nimue's spell and found her charm a prison; there may not be handles on the other side of the door this elven marvel invites you through. Rational minds wisely avoided the deeps and seeps, writing on the edges of known maps that beyond lie dragons. The diction and lilt of this is so silken, surely a fairy-charm, refuted by a poet who's already gotten lost in LaLaLand and learned her lesson. Dorothy has the ruby combat boots to prove that Emerald Cities lavish on a black stalk of razor-throrn'd storm. Raised my hair, too, almost getting lost in the lavish lyric here. Thanks for hauling me back out by the soles. - Brendan

    ReplyDelete
  4. Reading this made the hairs on my neck stand up too (they always curl, lol). Love the deliciously sinister feel of your faerie tale!

    ReplyDelete
  5. I can't remember when last I was so captivated by a fairy poem (usually I avoid such subjects). I was transported, from the first stanza, to a place far beyond the modern distortion/ commercialization of fairies - back to faerie, to my childhood when these beings existed. If you told me you had faeries at the bottom of your garden, I would not doubt it to be true.

    ReplyDelete
  6. ha ha ha ha I like this, Makes them other worldly people seem so not Disney!

    Loved the form and meter near 100% on the rhythm.

    ReplyDelete
  7. This is wonderfully imagined and the details are a (ahem) joy. I especially like:

    "as she steps her ivory feet, each toe
    bends like wicker in her leafy shoe;
    something about her smiling seems
    to drift the air with breathing dreams."

    I have to say, though, that I am stunned that our same Witch who has faced down (poetical) ghosts and (real) canna leaf rollers should be stopped cold by a fairie! Ah well, back away slowly, don't make eye contact, and leave her to me. ;-)

    ReplyDelete
  8. ah she hides something under her softness...love the contrast of the "careless" rhymes and the creepy feeling at the end..

    ReplyDelete
  9. something about her smiling seems to drift the air with breathing dreams... really cool.

    ReplyDelete
  10. "something about her smiling seems
    to drift the air with breathing dreams."

    Lovely. There is a melodic charm befitting your composition—which is complex in terms of speaker's relationship to subject. An quite a powerful end to make the speaker retreat and lose ownership. What I appreciate most is that each stanza leads the imagination; woven in lyrical fantasy.

    ReplyDelete
  11. beautifully written

    i really like this part:

    something about her isn’t right
    and yet she's perfect in the night,

    ReplyDelete
  12. That's great. I was told recently that purple is the colour of protection and I've been wearing more of it lately. I love this poem because it feels like it's talking to me personally.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Delightfully haunting and playful. (Hugs)Indigo

    ReplyDelete
  14. Now this is one cool faerie, not one of those insipid little Disneyesque creatures! Love it!

    ReplyDelete
  15. And her name was psilocybis cubensis...

    ReplyDelete
  16. Putting character to nature and breathing out the life that reverberates through this colored curling...a strange and melodic little creature put before our eyes. Sorry the fairy was too much for you to handle though! ;)

    ReplyDelete
  17. I really really enjoyed this poem hedgewitch! Very cleverly written. I felt like If I had seen the Faerie girl, I too would be both mesmerized and chilled to the bone. Thank you for sharing!
    ~Corbie Sinclair

    ReplyDelete
  18. Absolutely a delight to read, Ms. Hedgewitch. Your talents are so versatile. Hey, I love your little mouse on the side:)

    ReplyDelete
  19. Lovely feel of a traditional oral poem. I can hear this spoken to a pipe and drum. As its proclaims both the beauty and danger of faery folk that we of the meadow and day should tread carefully in forest by dusk or moon

    ReplyDelete
  20. Oh just love the rhyme in this Joy...a fancyful treat of taking a trip with this lovely child of the forest into a place of wonder and magic...truly a joy to read...bkm

    ReplyDelete
  21. Being 'not right' and yet 'perfect' . . . oh yes.That last stanza is a wonderful revelation. Great work here. I'm loving your forms in these last posts.

    ReplyDelete
  22. The place where beauty and poison meet is a little pool in the woods, not to far from your house apparently. We just don't know of the epic battles fought there, just that it may be the last source of true magic left...and the faeries are pissed. Great job....gets me going.

    ReplyDelete
  23. I got goosebumps reading this, as though that little faerie girl were tickling her fingers along the nape of my neck. Love it.

    ReplyDelete
  24. This is enchanting .... as I read it, I flashed back to a very young Elizabeth Taylor with those violet eyes and shiny black hair.

    ReplyDelete
  25. I remember this poem well, remember thinking: Damn, I'm reading a poem about fairies and loving every bit of it :)

    ReplyDelete
  26. Great! Thanks for the pairing.

    ReplyDelete
  27. 'something about her isn’t right
    and yet she's perfect in the night,'

    sounds like my entire pre-marriage dating life. ;-)

    wonderful piece

    ReplyDelete
  28. Lovely in lilt, rhythm and rhyme. Love the careful backing away at the end.

    ReplyDelete
  29. magical piece.a midsummer night's dream kinda piece.loved it.

    ReplyDelete
  30. I agree with Kerry, I'm not really into faerie things, but this is different. This is perfect, Joy. I love it. And your photo with it. I looked at a lot of farm machinery and came up with two possibles on Rob Hanson's site, but neither of them seemed to fit your poem as your own photo does.
    K

    ReplyDelete
  31. ooh i love this, love the rhymes, so effective. it's gorgeous and stay away from those damn faeries!

    ReplyDelete
  32. Gotta love playing with colours ;)

    ReplyDelete
  33. Mysterious and a bit spooky. I'd leave her to own the place as well!

    ReplyDelete
  34. I love this one! I love your expressive view, the photo and the magic n' mystery of flowers! :D

    ReplyDelete
  35. if literature teaches us anything it's to beware of the faeries.
    enchantment is a double edged wand.
    hard to back away from that, i'd think.

    ReplyDelete

'Poetry is an echo asking a shadow to dance' ~Carl Sandburg