Monday, July 11, 2011

Words






Words


Write your soul a blanket on the page
with black wrinkled stripes on pure white,
in any tongue on earth. Throw
your zebra quilt over
every shivering   
heart and offer
refuge there,
wrapped in
words.



July 2011


Posted for       Form Monday   at  OneStopPoetry


This poem is in the Nonet form, a nine line single stanza poem where the first line contains nine syllables, and each succeeding line one less, with the last line a single syllable. Thanks to  Corbie Sinclair for this great look at the form, with sincere regrets that this is Gay Cannon's penultimate appearance hosting Form Monday.Thanks for everything, Gay.





 

21 comments:

  1. Feelings thought and expression formed into a pattern of words. View the form -- a funnel, half of an hourglass, more down to less filtered at the exit, or maybe less expanded in wondrous explosion at the release.

    Nice, I like it. Made my day a happier time.

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  2. I love this Joy...nonets are wonderfully succinct. Finding refuge wrapped in words...very nice. :)

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  3. Oh what beautiful images you make. Every time I finish one of your pieces I'm left stunned and wanting to cry as I did suddenly as I was walking down the staircase of the National Gallery in London. Tears flowed down my cheeks and surprised me as I felt so happy inside but sad too. I couldn't define it to myself but I think it was because I wanted to stay.

    I always want to stay wrapped in the artistry, beauty, comfort and "home" of your words, Joy. And thankfully I can. I really love you and them. Gay

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  4. Thank you, Gay. Your words are treasured, and your love returned.

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  5. Lovely ekphrastic poetry as I've now discovered is what you call these things!

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  6. @John--a great word which I admit I googled upon first meeting--it covers a lot of ground, yet retains specificity. Thanks for applying it here to my word quilt.

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  7. I liked the flow and pattern of your poem. It matched well with your image.

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  8. snuggling deep in that blanket...emotive hedge...now pass me some home brew...is it appropriate to belch after reading...i know in some countries it is respectful but...smiles.

    love it

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  9. @brian--no--that would not be the custom in a lady's house--but I'll let you get away with it at the new pub.

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  10. Until it comes time for me to be swallowed up by the gaping maw of Hades, I can think of little I would like more than to be wrapped up in words, especially yours because words love you the way they do.

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  11. Oh I so love this!!!!!!!! Pure comfort, in a poem. Wonderful, Hedge!

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  12. Thanks all--appreciate the time and comments. This was fun, I thought.

    @FB: I have a special flame-retardant version planned for when said Maw gapes for me. I can whip up another one cheap if interested.

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  13. Wonderfully snuggly images, as are the feelings engulfing the reader when trailing through your words.

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  14. ...

    this safety blanket
    journal with threadbare pages
    how you comfort me

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  15. I always get so excited when I venture to your neck of the woods, and I never leave disappointed. This was wonderful! and I thought the image amazing. You so KNOW why we write these words, why we bleed them onto the paper. Once again, I humbly bow...and am SO looking forward to sharing my flask! :)

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  16. Loved the creativity you used to express something so simple.

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  17. Lately I am more of a mind to rip the blanket, shred it and hold the nudity of them I target out for all to meditate upon. Just call it summer in the city!

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  18. This is what writing does for me. It's survival. This is a great, original way of seeing. Thank you.

    Another new form! And I haven't tried a shadorma yet . . .

    :-)

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  19. @Ruth I love shadormas. So tidy and neat, yet elusive and ambiguous. This form I didn't like as well, but it was interesting, as always with form, to work in it and see what it facilitates and what it limits. Thanks for reading, and so glad you enjoyed.

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'Poetry is an echo asking a shadow to dance' ~Carl Sandburg