Sunday, November 6, 2011

Status Report~Earthquake


Just a quick update to let everyone know we had several earthquakes here yesterday, the strongest coming in at  5.6 on the Richter. All is well, no injuries anywhere, no major damage in our area, though some closer to the epicenter experienced tumbling chimneys, destroyed bric-a-brac and the like.

I was in bed reading when it happened, and I've never experienced anything like it. One can see why  Poseidon Earthshaker was a potent deity. There's something overwhelmingly personal about these types of events that speak to us on an entirely different level, and profoundly effect the imagination. Maybe it's the sense of powerlessness shattering our complacency, maybe it's simple awe, but I think part at least is the sense that the natural world is not ever completely knowable. Whatever else it is, it's definitely a catalyst.  I'll close with a quote:

It is not light that we need, but fire; it is not the gentle shower, but thunder. We need the storm, the whirlwind, and the earthquake.
~Frederick Douglass


Image: Courtesy US Geological Survey 

 

18 comments:

  1. The worst I've ever been through is a 4. Glad you're OK.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I weep for the bric a brac. I cry out for justice for the headless Hummels and shed tears for the fallen velvet poker dogs. I'm sorry that an angry God turned Oklahoma into an electric football game. Those were never any fun anyway. The fearful eyes of the plastic Kitty Kat Clocks will haunt me forever as they roll back and forth. I can only imagine the desolation of Country Bob's Drive-Rite Used Cars. Round the decay, reduced to a colossal wreck, boundless and bare the lone and level sands stretch far away.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Yes it is quite an experience that not all have - but when you do you experience the power of nature you realise how powerless we really are. Glad no-one was injured and you are OK.

    ReplyDelete
  4. @FB: You nailed it, sista. ;-)


    Thanks Cait and MAJ_really it was indescribable.

    ReplyDelete
  5. i am glad you are ok hedge....that is what is important...nature is surely unpredictable...we had one this year which is not something that happens frequently...crazy world these days eh? and an asteroid is doing a near pass on tuesday...smiles.

    ReplyDelete
  6. We had a 7 point something here a few months back. Of course Vancouver Island is along the faultline that California sits on as well....yikes. It is a strange feeling when the land under one vibrates and you wait, suspended, to see exactly how bad it will be. I must say I enjoyed Fireblossom's comment entirely too much, given the scary topic - she slays me. I'm glad there was no major damage or loss. Whew. This time!

    ReplyDelete
  7. Thanks bri--yes totally crazy. The drought, wildfires, severe storms and tornados will just not be enough now to hold my interest. :P

    Whoa, Sherry. 7.0 is definitely scary. Glad you were okay. This one was nowhere near that kind --that does damage, but it was stunning to feel the world move that way, as you say. It lasted almost a full minute, which was way too long--long enough to wonder what's going to come next.

    ReplyDelete
  8. So glad you a fine. It can be a hell of a ride. Magic.

    ReplyDelete
  9. I've been through a 7.1 and many smaller quakes. My cousin lives close to you, so does my aunt. They were upset I didn't call them. I shrugged and forgot other people don't experience them as often as I do.

    Glad to know you are all right. Hopefully Loki's bowl is empty now and Sigyn is standing dutifully by his side.

    ReplyDelete
  10. I am so happy that you are okay!

    ReplyDelete
  11. As I told Shay, I'll take a tornado any day!

    ReplyDelete
  12. @MZ: It was totally freaky, yes? Like being picked up and very gently shaken by something way too big that could mash you any time it cared to.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Goodness, I've been out all day but now greatly relieved you are well.

    ReplyDelete
  14. glad you are ok. it was felt by some in the St. Louis metro area which I don't live far from. Just spent 30 minutes trying to get my daughter to go to bed - she's scared there is going to be a deadly earthquake here tonight. Like I said, I am glad you are ok.

    ReplyDelete
  15. I just did not realize you were in Oklahoma, and would have come sooner if I did. I am glad you are okay and it sounds like your house and property are fine. Sure hope that is the end of it for a long time, in spite of Frederick Douglass' remarkable quote!

    The one I remember happened while I was in bed asleep. I was confused to see my cat momentarily hovering over the bed, as she had jumped abnormally high straight up in utter fear. The epicenter was 4 miles away so it sounded like a train was barreling underneath the house. As you mentioned, neighbors lost chimneys, etc., but my only loss was a broken soap dish and vase when they collided in the bathroom. I still remember the sound, even more than the rocking.
    Take care, Hedge.

    ReplyDelete
  16. I am glad you are all right! I appreciate your perspective here, and the end quote by Douglass. It's one thing to love nature and its beauty, and another thing to accept her dramas, which we can't control. A bit easier to do when all is well!

    ReplyDelete
  17. Well, I could do with a few headless garden gnomes, but I think a home shaken is a sanctum broken, and invasion that can lead some pissed-off lines in defense of letting old gods die, or at least lie quietly fer crhissake. Take a pill, Poseidon. East coasters got a taste of this fall in a rare tremor that rolled everywhere. After all the spinnings of your sky, it must have been quite freaky to feel the cyclone underfoot. Glad to hear you're OK, and awaiting a poem that goes bumpdebumpdebedonkedonk in the night. - Brendan

    ReplyDelete
  18. @Lydia: i am picturing your cat. I can only imagine! I have a dog that is extremely nervous in thunderstorms, and this event confirmed her worst fears, I'm afraid--all the rest of the evening she was glued to me, with a look that said "I told you so!" ;-)

    @Ruth and B.: Thanks for your concern. Really, nothing happened, no one was hurt, and the whole experience was simply cool--yet underneath, the fear of a tremendous unknown with devastating potential, kind of made for a weird feel. As a collector of sensations and lover of the natural powers around us, I was pleasantly thrilled; as a small fragile mortal, I was both impressed and fearful. But really, all's well that ends well, even if the geologists say this is quite likely to happen again along the same fault line. The gods are restless, it seems.

    ReplyDelete

'Poetry is an echo asking a shadow to dance' ~Carl Sandburg