Thursday, March 21, 2013

Storm Flower






Storm Flower




When day began to
split the night like cordwood,
winter went on a
week long masquerade
wearing green west wind
for robes, sunning
the pear into too-soon white ruffles,
paper petals suddenly browning
in the late frost
of unmasking;

under blurred blizzard
midnight
 March blooms instead
the moon's white eye,
 a living flower
of  storm.




~March 2013



55 sepia petals for    the   g-man










Image: Pear Blossoms, © joyannjones


22 comments:

  1. Thank You Old Man Winter for causing a brief return of the Muse to the Hedgewitch.
    Your Floral 55's are such a JOY to behold.
    Thank You so much for these beautiful contributions.
    Have a Kick Ass Week-End

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  2. GIN!!!!!

    (Rummy, not the Juniper kind)

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  3. beautiful visuals hedge...the moon blooming there in the end...day splitting night...if only we could be done with the snow and wearing green though....they are saying we will get snow again this weekend....arghhh!

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  4. Beautiful lament to the winter weather not leaving soon enough. I hope I read it correctly, Joy Ann.

    Pamela

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    1. Yep. We always seem to get a late frost after everything has been tricked into blooming. Good to see you, pamela.

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  5. A first rate nature poem here. I'm not quoting; it's all exceedingly well written.

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  6. Ah--so sad when that happens even though you've made it so beautiful. I (whiney me) am still at my office at 9:44 pm so cannot say more. Just another... ah. k.

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    1. I've been thinking btw of that James Wright poem - To a Blossoming Pear Tree--it is nothing like yours but since you seem to be thinking about blossoming pear trees you may find it interesting. k.

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    2. I didn't mean to imply with "may find it interesting" anything about whether you know it already or not. I don't really know much wright, but once stuck something important in a book of his that a close friend had, and the place I stuck it was on that poem. k.

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    3. Sorry to hear you are still slaving away, k. I like Wright, and just looked that particular poem up--I haven't ever read it, I think, so thanks--it is quite the contrast of human and natural karma, if you will--the ethereal and the awful visceral.

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  7. PS--liking the sidebar music. I saw that show, with Emmylou and Mumford together. The lead singer was properly worshipful of Her Majesty.

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    Replies
    1. As well he should be. I like his voice--(and of course, she is the original harmony queen who could make a braying donkey sound good.)

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  8. I'm feeling this all right! Pretty, pretty work, Hedge.

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  9. Stellar poetry, Hedge. I'll wait out the winter months for your spring poems any time! The last stanza is astounding in its scope and expression.

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  10. Yep, it just doesn't want to go. Great write.

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  11. Like cord wood! Oh you are onto something with that one! enjoyed you 55! No more blizzards please-
    Thanks!

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  12. You captured March's split personality perfectly. Lovely images.

    Flash 55 - Witch Love

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  13. This is really nice. I hate when everything gets ready for spring too early. Those blizzards certainly have a way of making their appearance.

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  14. Beautifully done.

    This is what happened here in MI last year -- mild winter, early spring, blossoms out a whole month too soon, then a tragic late frost.

    Tart cherries were hit especially hard, but apples, pears, and peaches all suffered. Still very wintery now. Hope that bodes well.

    Cheers!
    JzB

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  15. The first four lines are... just... so beautiful. Critiquing poetry really isn't my thing, but I KNOW what I like, and I REALLY like this little gem.

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  16. Now that's talent, when you can even make this endless winter beautiful with your words.

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'Poetry is an echo asking a shadow to dance' ~Carl Sandburg