Wednesday, October 30, 2013

The Necromancer







The Necromancer



Long hours, back bent aching
I've spent tinkering with the relics.
My eyes water from peering
under yellowing light
for the sweet

outlier, its nyctophillic
touch, the exuberant spark
so well-hid,
the divine animation of
the incurably dead.

But bones are recalcitrant, 
the heartbeat cleaves dry
to its mouth-roof.
The frog won't hop,
the mouse-muscle

shudders, un-alive in the
current's bite. I open the chrysalis
of the ether soaked moth, my last
hope crying to see
I can't make it fly.

I only long to reverse
the order of things, to grasp
even once time ticking in my fist,
twist back its setting, but dead
is forever,

and what's gone down that hole
will never come back.

~October 2013




posted for      real toads
Challenge: Out of Standard: To Monster with Love
Isadora Gruye of the Nice Cage blog once more has us looking at things with a different squint, and asks us to write about our monsters with a loving slant. She says "My one rule will be that you choose an iconic monster: by which I mean a monster who is recognizable to more than four people (okay, so I am swinging a bit loose with that definition, but you get the point!)"

.I hope my necromancer, who is of course, just a trope for the Mad Scientist, will meet this requirement.







Image: Astral Person, by Remedios Varo, via wikipaintings.org
This artwork may be protected by copyright. It is posted on the site in accordance with fair use principles.



21 comments:

  1. Stephen King said, in his novel Pet Sematary, "Sometimes dead is better." However, you really bring to life this creepy character's hope and subsequent disappointment that his pretties won't budge.

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  2. suitable accompaniment to the image, and the hinge is the key: "but bones are recalcitrant"

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  3. hedgey....I was so happy to see the title, and hunkered right done to enjoy this piece. There is so much I adore here, I just want to share it all with you. Firstly, I love the voice of the character, you matched his excitement toe for toe with images of the persistent futility...dry heartbeats, the flightless ether soaked moth. I also adore the balance of images and voice, I only long to reverse
    the order of things, to grasp
    even once time ticking in my fist,

    eek gads, you are writing on the top shelf as always......this is just my type of Halloween poem, thank you so much for stopping by the out of standard and leaving such a fine work. Viva la

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  4. Ha. This is a very fun poem with a strong serious side. Wonderful word play--from the terrific opening ==one never sympathizes with the aching back of the necromancer--but what I wanted to comment on was the great sound of tinker and relic--and the whole idea of eyes watering---here almost as if they too were trying to irrigate something dead plant--

    outlier--seems to have a special weight here-- anything lying around!--and incurably dead is a wonderful phrase too. Though I think my favorite stanza has to be the one with the recalcitrant bones and the dry roof of mouth of the heart. What is great is that you follow through your metaphor so thoroughly--one thinks of making time stand still but here the fist wants the opposite - to allow the sand to flow--really a wonderful idea--and very humanitarian. Great Alicey (I could mean Cooper here) end. Thanks. k

    PS - such a fun challenge which you've carried out so well. I am tempted, but am going to try to focus here (at least on job work if nothing else! Until I will be calling on that sympathetic necromancer. Ha.)

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    1. PPS - I wanted to say that there is something especially great about the recalcitrant bones--I feel like they are trying to recalcify - and the ether-soaked moth has this echo of aether-soaked--you know, too much sky going on. Even trying to make the moth fly feels to me like a transformation -- this necromancer likes the every day--I feel like there is a lot of this word play going on here--even the light is sort of aging--I can't cite it all -- but it adds to the rich fun of the poem -- great stanza breaks - especially the muscle one I thought - but all of them really--the outlier one too --

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    2. Thanks, k. Yes, prompts like this were meant to tempt us away into the dastardly frivolity of writing poetry. ;_) I am so glad you enjoyed it. I have to share that I tried very hard to use outlaw-er(as per you altar ego) but then stumbled on outlier, the thing set apart from the herd, as a sufficient alternative. Words are so plastic compared to life--maybe that's their attraction. You definitely picked up on all my undertones here--there was also another word hiding there in recalcitrant, calcareous, one that is more mineral-y, but it escaped me at the time and recalcitrant after all suits the meaning. Ossify would be good in this somewhere, too.

      I hope you are having 'fun' with the manuscripts and making some headway. I know work never seems to abate for you, but hope it is going as well as can be expected.Everything is relative, after all. I'm currently happy just to have a computer running again. ;_)

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    3. Congrats on your computer. Everything is relative and I know I am truly lucky to have a job despite the fact that it seems to "have" me at the moment! Am glad that your first poem, I take it, on your new computer is so re-vitalizing. k.

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  5. nyctophyllic....new one on me...but i like it like i like my night...the opening of the chrysallis and crying over not being able to make the moth fly...that was a really touching part to me....the longing to reverse the order of things...i like that as well...

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  6. *sigh* your sound play throughout...magical.

    I love this:

    "of the ether soaked moth, my last
    hope crying to see
    I can't make it fly."

    I really enjoy your line break, Hedge, after "my last" makes me think twice...the last moth...or the last hope...

    Excellent writing, truly.

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  7. "The divine animation of the incurably dead" I know some people that are breathing that could use someone with that gift. There is a dark magic feel to this that I love. As I was reading it I was thinking of your computer that went down the hole... :)

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  8. Necromancer
    is such a great word, isn't it?
    and then the connotations flow through,
    (or both together depending on your language theory stance ;)

    regardless, its just one of those words that makes it worth being literate.

    K. makes a great comment and I see what she does by degree . . .

    I open the chrysalis
    of the ether soaked moth . . .

    I can't make it fly.

    hit me in the gut-brain like a derailing ghost train
    and


    I only long to reverse
    the order of things, to grasp
    even once time ticking in my fist, - - - - I wish I had written this!!!!!

    twist back its setting, but dead

    is forever,

    and what's gone down that hole

    will never come back

    BUT

    with that ending I was
    dragged into the abyss like an abyss lover on abyss day -

    willingly and happily,
    the futility of resistance
    in the face of such a sudden impact

    would be counterproductive -

    just go with the flow,
    after all, going down THAT hole
    is only like taking a break in OLD MEXICO!!!

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  9. I only long to reverse
    the order of things, to grasp
    even once time ticking in my fist,


    thank the head honcho of old Mexico for you hedge
    you always manage to inspire me as I low-ebb my way thru a bell curve.

    thank you x :)

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    Replies
    1. My pleasure, Arron, always...and I agree about the word necromancer--and all such arcane fancies--making the concept of literate worth being. Thanks also for the very high compliment--nothing I appreciate more than the schadenfreude I feel when someone wishes they had written my lines--especially someone whose own lines are *always* straight from the head demon's inner stockpile, like yours.

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  10. The sweet outlier as the spark! Necessary but random--and the frog won't hop. I empathize, in so far as this allegorizes writing poetry with such an aching back. Fun.

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  11. Specially this part: But bones are recalcitrant,
    the heartbeat cleaves dry
    to its mouth-roof.
    The frog won't hop,
    the mouse-muscle


    Chilling perfection - I would expect nothing less from you HW, smiles ~

    Hope you are well ~

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  12. Excellent work, Hedge! It must be a hard task to learn the art of necromancy, faced so often with failure. As always I love your use of language - it is stellar.

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    1. Thanks, Kerry. Yes, his is a thankless task, I'm afraid.;_)

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  13. i long to reverse the order of things, too.

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  14. The wicked wicker wyrk is never done, is it, incanting the living world from dead words ... Yet we never stop trying to stir up somethin' out of nuthin'. Maybe another Book ... or metaphor ... or computer ... the blasted heath of hope springeth eternal. Every necromancer is a Merlin, damned by charm of that Niniane whose secret bower's beneath the tongue. Oh well. Thanks for the All Hallows breviary.

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    1. Yes, making dead things live--there's a lot more to it than a little juice and a Necronomicon. I have had some dark wordless days, but then something will come along that burns like naptha in the devil's kitchen, and the experiments begin anew. I hope you can continue to find your own words, B. Best to you as well.

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'Poetry is an echo asking a shadow to dance' ~Carl Sandburg