Sunday, January 16, 2011

WineSpeak






WineSpeak


Playing at love poured out in a twist stem crystal glass
clear ruby,with notes of cherry and madagascar vanilla bean,
I’m here to sing them straight from your lips, drinking in a kiss
heavier than the outlaw tang of saddle, earth and tobacco,
far sweeter, sunnier than cranberry, red current, ripe raspberry
chambered blackberry, or clamoring, astringent key lime.
I'll crush the garnet red fruit and bitter black together
tilt back my head and toss them down, the taste
teasing to a lingering earthy finish
(tangerine and nectarine)
with just a bit of pepper and
restrained use of oak.

It’s all nuanced
fragrantly
integrated
with
waxy
apricot
spice
bright green
apple
acidity
(and pears)
dusty
fruit
on the nose
of living
with a round
lush
mouthfeel
against
a mossy
background,
(no kiwi)
aged
to finish
short and dry
with perhaps a little heat,leaving behind
a fleeting hint of licorice and clove over wet stone.
A vintage year for pinot noir, chenin blanc and the occasional lover.


January 2011




Disclaimer: all these analogies and terms are commonly used in the world of wine critique. I simply rearranged them a bit in a silly shape to entertain myself (and hopefully the reader) on a very dull day.





Image: Rare Georgian Knopped Opaque Twist Wine Glass c1760, poetically described as
"A superb example of a triple knopped double series opaque twist ...antique wine glass. The bell bowl sits above a stem with a pair of heavy spiral threads outside of a loose central gauze, and with shoulder, medial, and basal knops. Conical foot with rough, snapped pontil...."  source link

32 comments:

  1. Okay, I want me a glass of THAT, and in THAT particular wineglass!:)

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  2. I love the shape and I loved the words. This makes me want to have some of THAT wine very badly! :)

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  3. You poured a wonderful glass of wine...wish I could put my hand through the screen, pick it up for a sip.garnet red and bitter black sounds yummy...fun read...bkm

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  4. Ooo, very well constructed, my friend! Figuratively and literally you build for us the wine glass - and kudos to you on the image; I must say, a glass of wine always does taste better with a lover to share it with. Splendid write.

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  5. lady that is too cool
    a perfect bouquet :)

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  6. Wow, this is amazing! Love the imagery, you make it so real! Interesting way to shape the poem too.

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  7. All I know about wine is that it hurts when your bass player breaks a bottle of Mad Dog over your head. Hell on the hair, too.

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  8. No back pedal necessary on this one. Shaped poetry is a skill and this one reads like the wine of lovers it describes. Nicely done HW. Truly.

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  9. nice and thank you for sharing that champagne glass.. be prepared for a surprise when you visit mine~ http://fiveloaf.wordpress.com/2010/06/19/my-whole-world/

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  10. Well done. Clever. Don't know how you had the patience for the wine-glass arrangement, but kudos. :-) Quite wonderful.

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  11. Many thanks, all.

    @twm; Yes, I can believe doing this with any serious intent would involve a lot of skill.

    @coalblack: Always best to keep your head as far as possible from the Wine of the Century..and possibly bass players *makes note*

    @Jamie--actually the shape was quite trying at times, but not difficult, and ended up actually helping things along. Never done this before and always thought it frivolous, but it turned out to be quite fun.

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  12. Oh, wow. I'm married to a former wine specialist (still expert). Can't wait to share this with him. The form is so good. This is superb, my friend.

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  13. Gorgeous. I bet you can make Arbor Mist sound good.

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  14. The language of wine is much like the language of perfume - very musical and magical. I think it comes from trying to describe something that is basically indescribable in only words.

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  15. wow, a whine cup shape..

    you impress me a great deal.
    Cheers.

    AAA

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  16. Goodness, wish I know how to ferment that particular wine. Very nice!

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  17. I loved the way the words were presented and darn it all, I have to say that now I have some high falutin' wine language now. Now maybe I can say something like "I love all its nuances and integrations" instead of "yeah, just give me the biggest, cheapest box ya got"

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  18. Amazing. Much like all of my drinks, it is sad when I get to the end since it comes up so fast (depending on how fast I want to forget). I learn from you every time I read your writing, look forward to more!

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  19. Loved the form, and the feeling--a smorgasborg for my senses. Especially loved (and pears) (no kiwi) Excellent!

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  20. Your wine poem was playful, yet sublime. Form forward, yet not at all lacking in meaning. Can be read now but will still be enjoyable in a few years. The appearance of effortless construction betrays a master hand. Bravo!

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  21. Fun, clever work, as yours often is.

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  22. SO sexy! Love the conjured images.

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  23. That was fantastic. Both the jargon and the tempo were great. Fascinating to read it through a few times and see how you integrated a certain attitude & imagery into the poem. Very sharp witted, something I always appreciate. Great poem all the way through! Hope all is well,

    crb.

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  24. Thanks very much all. This one was quite fun.

    @crb: All is good, except I can't believe I'd left you off the blogroll. Officially fixed.

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  25. Joy Ann, Nicely laid out shape poem and I love the fruity terminology. I now want a glass of wine.
    Pamela

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  26. Brilliant! I'll drink to that!

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'Poetry is an echo asking a shadow to dance' ~Carl Sandburg