Saturday, April 14, 2012

Windblown

Tornado Alley is expected to be a busy place for the wind today, so the odds are I'll be offline--we had the sirens wake us last night at 3:00 AM, for a twister that passed a mile to our north-northeast, and people south of us were not so fortunate, where an F2 hit in the middle of another town (sending thoughts and concern your way, those who live there.)

Still, close only counts in horseshoes and hand grenades, and all is well here at Castle Hedgewitch as of now, but today is supposed to be worse than yesterday once all the factors wake up and come together later this afternoon. Therefor I'm posting my poem for the day early, as should it start seriously storming, the PC will be turned off. 

Never a dull moment, folks. This is one I've had in the files, and worked up a bit for this particular theme.







Windblown




Climb the long hill
up from the cradle
hear the mockingbird
play out his fraud, the
idiot squirrel savant clattering speech
to put the mushrooms and acorns to sleep.

Fly the long wind
that blows through the years
needled with pine and regret
making clouds mountains, pretzeling trees, 
and tired grow wings that wear it from birth
above the hard calling spin of the earth.

Ride the long wave
that comes in the night
sorcerer’s hand disappearing sleep.
Wrap up in the foam and dig in the sand
try to breathe try to float, try turning to rise
from the pull, heart full of what reason denies.

Take the long chance; today is tomorrow.
Live in the wind where love crushes sorrow.





February/April 2012






Image: Windblown, © joy ann jones 2012

23 comments:

  1. I so love the lilt and the rhyme of this...it reads just beautifully. So many wonderful lines: "needled with pine and regret"...."ride the long wave that comes in the night"...beautiful work, Hedge. Hope you stay safe through the storm!

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  2. I have clipped and copied the last two lines of your poem ... printed them, attached with magnet to my refrigerator. Be safe ..

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    1. Thank you, Helen--that's quite a compllment. So far so good, today.

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  3. Fly the long wind
    that blows through the years
    needled with pine and regret...

    Some of the best lines I've read all week! I know it may sound crass, for one to say this who lives far from twisters and the havoc they wreak, but my imaginative mind, plugged in to Oz etc, thinks it's so cool you live where you do.. Where else would one expect to find the Hedgewitch but in Tornado Alley?

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    1. PS. Wanted to add how much I love the canna with its variegated leaves, and the Paul Simon clip. Thanks for those. Peace !!

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    2. You're most welcome, Kerry--and every area has its hazards--tsunamis, wildfires,mudslides, earthquakes, hurricanes and what have you--so we all sooner or later can meet nature in a wild mood. So glad you enjoyed this one, and the Paul Simon has been in my head since brian's comment yesterday--glad to pass it around.

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  4. Cait follows Kerry:-)

    I love the last two lines like Helen.
    And I love the clever first lines of all verses with the use of the word long.
    A beautiful poem.....
    Stay safe.......

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    1. ...whose daughter's name is Cait (so it goes). Don't you wish blogger would figure out it's apostrophes?

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    2. I know--you O &#39 people can get confusing. ;-) Thanks Cait.

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  5. live in the wind...i love that...though i take offense for the squirrel...i love squirrels...haha...stay safe today friend...not sure i would want to be in your place...

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    1. I'll try--so far it's gone north and east of us, so Kansas is once again in the headlights--look out Toto.

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  6. Trusting you are still safe...second stanza and final couplets my favorites here (if one can choose favorites in a perfect poem). Thank you for this loveliness in the midst of storm.

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  7. This is beautiful, Joy... inspiring and delightful with metaphor. I was especially taken with

    "idiot squirrel savant clattering speech" and

    "the long wind
    that blows through the years
    needled with pine and regret"

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  8. breathtaking ending, and I happen to like the squirrel description, too funny

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  9. This is beautiful. Good luck. Stay well. K.

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  10. I hope the tornadoes and winds stay their distance and you don't/didn't have to "Fly the long wind" or "Ride the long wave", but may love always crush your sorrows.

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  11. We here in Florida get occasional haunts of big wind -- storm fronts, summer thunderstorms, glancing hurricanes -- though not with the sort of omnipresence that keeps the Oklahoma wind-farms churning. Such pneuma here in this poem, the free spirit, so far over "the idiot savant squirrel clattering speech" -- you're talking about Mitt Romney, or the local Tea Party demagogues? What an astounding affirmation:

    Take the long chance; today is tomorrow.
    Live in the wind where love crushes sorrow.


    Thank you -- I'll seize that day, too, hoist that banner to our winds. Hope all was/is safe in your nook of Twister Alley. - Brendan

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    1. Great catch on the squirrel/mockingbird--that was exactly what I was going for. Yes, I was thinking of Florida yesterday, where you get all kinds of seasonal weather violence-- hurricanes and tornadoes, too, seems like overkill. And other parts of the world, who get their own disasters served up fairly often. But we were spared anything besides storm and rain here--though 5 were killed in your Okie lineman's town of Woodward, where the lightning apparently knocked out the storm warning sirens-(-took out a trailer park, so it's a miracle it was only 5.)

      Thanks for reading, B, and every wind needs a banner, don't you think?

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  12. This is quietly amazing. The opening stanza is full of marvelous images, but the idea of putting "mushrooms and acorns to sleep" is singular. It is lines like that, that make poetry poetic.

    "and tired grow wings that wear it from birth
    above the hard calling spin of the earth." These lines themselves roll and shift with a beautiful power that is so much like the thing they describe.

    Take the long chance...well, why not? I love this entire poem.

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    1. As always, Shay, you pick out my own favorite lines. Thanks for this, and your other wonderful and very much appreciated comments today all over the blog.

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  13. Wonderful poem out of the turbulent season! I love the feeling of submission to annihilation ('least that's how I take it) that Rumi gets at. When I came here I had just read the line by Robert Henri, "He paints like a man going over the top of a hill, singing," which may be a bit gentler than twisters, but I like thinking about poetry and love as stepping away into another country where exploration is mysterious, and dangerous.

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  14. this is where i want to live. it seems so elusive at times. i find it, and of course lose it. i wish i could find this oasis on the breeze, pitch a sturdy tent and always remain where i am at peace. this places seems to move and must to found again and again.

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  15. This reads beautifully. And, "idiot squirrel savant?" That's just brilliant.

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'Poetry is an echo asking a shadow to dance' ~Carl Sandburg