Sunday, April 19, 2015

Half Moon



Half Moon






We each painted half the moon's face--
dark spots, smile, comet trace,
arched an eyebrow's meteoric lace,
ruffled her collar with snow
half-past the wing of a crow:
a clown sky-high, half-seen, half-blind,
cut in two but made to shine
above where we curved and brushed,
undone but artful in the grassy dust
as colors turned to black-white bands.
I was nothing but

the sketch of your hands,
the charcoal lines of that touch
distracted with flowers
that outlines the landscape of lust;
half the clown moon shone for hours,
half set. The firefly's wineglass blinked bright--
half-light, half-dark, half-light--
synced with locusts' paintbrush legs
there where I came to beg
your grace for half a day
and was not turned away.



 ~April 2015




If you'd like to hear the poem read by the author, please click below:







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Challenge: Going Halfsies
That mistress of  winsome elephants. Karin Gustafson (ManicdDaily) asks us to contemplate the concept of halves, and also of  Mae West, sex and silver linings. There is a little bit of most of that here, in a jack of all trades-master of none sort of way.





Optional Musical Accompaniment












Image: Detail; Clown For the Adventure of the Lacemaker and the Rhinoceros, 1958, Salvador Dali
Fair use via wikiart.org






14 comments:

  1. Wonderful to hear you read it... the rhymes are so effective here, and works to drive the poem... the image of the locust's brush bring magic to the painting.. somehow I have a feeling being stuck there in the middle..

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  2. This is so beautiful... :D The flow of the lines is absolutely brilliant..!!

    We each painted half the moon's face--
    dark spots, smile, comet trace,
    arched an eyebrow's meteoric lace,
    ruffled her collar with snow
    half-past the wing of a crow:
    a clown sky-high, half-seen, half-blind,
    cut in two but made to shine

    Loved it :D
    xoxo

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  3. Hey Joy, first thanks so much for posting the reading. It is especially important in this month to be able to slow down and focus on a poem and your reading enabled me to do that in a way that I had not reading it on the page-- not that it is not all there but the images are quite compressed. I have all kinds of ideas about the relationship and the end reminds me of that kind of break-up love-- but what I particularly appreciated was the descriptions that are so specifically redolent of moonlight in the most naturalistic way-- the bands of light and darkness and the way that the light is like dust and then the way that a body in lovemaking becomes the trace of hands-- a strong sense of the cup half empty and half full here though I have that reversed I believe. T hanks. Forgive me commenting on phone so disheveled. K.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks, k--yes I wanted to read this one because it is so compressed and even perhaps tangled, but which half of the past isn't? Thanks for the wonderful challenge.

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  4. I really enjoyed this, especially when you read it. There is artistry in your words and spoken word.

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  5. I love "half past the wing of a crow".......and your closing lines wrap this poem in a bow and deliver it beautifully.

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  6. The firefly's wineglass blinked bright--.... the first five lines and from here on I esp love. There are so many images here - it really takes several reading to get the feel of it.I can't tap into your recording unfortunately, wish I could.

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  7. half-past the wing of a crow, The firefly's wineglass blinked bright-- half-light, half-dark, half-light-
    There is so much to love in this. You made a poem about "half" so beautiful.

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  8. I love the gorgeous language, on the page and in your voice, and I'm glad about the poem's ending! (Enjoyed the music too.)

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  9. Full moons are terrible. When they were closer to the earth, they could cause hundred, thousand-mile tides My father says he and my mother had sex four times, all during the full moon, at which time me and all my siblings were sired. So much for grand events: we get the rest by halves and quarters, settling for what we see and find there (always a reflection of ourselves). Even that is, as the prophets of AC/DC sang, a "touch too much." And the half of what we settle for is somehow the half we begrudge, or think we do, our own coherent selves and addled mix of selective history and stubborn desires. Anyway -- deft tracery here, composing the poem in strokes leading to a flourish or signature the completes and erases the work at once. May West was a full mooner, wasn't she? "Honey, when I'm bad I'm bad. But when I'm really bad, I'm good."

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  10. Wonderful both reading and hearing...
    ZQ

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  11. The rhyming here is so well done as to seem accidental. I love the moon you've drawn, whole or half, shining brightly.

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  12. Well, you don't do anything by half measures. This one is dark and light and dark and lovely.

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  13. the link between verses is made that much more powerful with your reading, and the close is languidly hopeful ~

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'Poetry is an echo asking a shadow to dance' ~Carl Sandburg