Monday, April 15, 2013

Distance





Distance




Love is a condition of distance,
an emanation which
 approach dissolves,
imagination
 remakes.



~April 2013


















I used the first line of this micro-poem the other day to illustrate another piece(Anti-Koan); thought I would give context here.








Images © joyannjones





7 comments:

  1. This nugget of wisdom and perspective is perfectly expressed. The photos are spectacular, too.

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  2. Having lived with long-distance relationships--and I don't think that is particularly what refer to here--I have mixed feelings about this one. Yes, and no.

    And then when the distance is time - or where it's not romance involved - hmmm.... yes, but also, well - I'm not sure. And there, of course, is where the imagiination comes in. Well done.

    I am missing poetry in some ways, but just cannot imagine. Feel as if I've almost lost track of language a bit, but enjoying yours. k.

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    1. Well, one is always opening a can of worms when one generalizes, but one can only speak for oneself here. I imagine your brain is more in storing than expressing mode right now, K--the myriad literary effects of your experiences will be no doubt be felt later--glad if I provided a verbal moment. ;_)

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  3. Oooh! The magnolia...sigh...and the love.. dissolving as one approaches.. I'm having a moment here too
    :-)

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  4. what I most enjoy here is the potential power of imagination over the definition of love. having never thought of it--love re. imagination--that way, I am enjoying that it blows apart some of my personal paradigms. great micro-work. i know these short ones often require much more specific thought and attention than maybe a longer piece where imagery carries.

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  5. You always claim not to be good at short poetry, but you could have fooled me.

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"We make out of the quarrel with others, rhetoric, out of the quarrel with ourselves, poetry." ~William Butler Yeats